Recent Mayslake Arthropods

by Carl Strang

Recent walks at Mayslake Forest Preserve have resulted in some photos to share, all involving Lepidoptera. The wild bergamot have been on the decline, but still were producing enough flowers to attract the attention of pollinators.

A hummingbird clearwing bellies up to the bar.

A hummingbird clearwing bellies up to the bar.

Another flower proved to be a fatal attraction to a cabbage white butterfly, which I saw curiously dangling beneath it.

The yellow flower head of the sow thistle had been a good hiding place for a crab spider. It and its prey dangled from the spider’s safety line until the butterfly was subdued.

The yellow flower head of the sow thistle had been a good hiding place for a crab spider. It and its prey dangled from the spider’s safety line until the butterfly was subdued.

Enough of the spider was hidden that I could not narrow its identity beyond being in one of two genera.

Wings may be in the future for today’s final subject.

This black swallowtail is maturing on a diet of water hemlock, a plant that is quite poisonous to humans.

This black swallowtail is maturing on a diet of water hemlock, a plant that is quite poisonous to humans.

 

Memorial Forest Clearing

by Carl Strang

The Memorial Forest is a public site, essentially an undeveloped county park, in my home county of Marshall, in Indiana. As I have spent much of my time in that county over the years, my list of its singing insects is nearly as complete as that for DuPage. I had never looked at the Memorial Forest, however. I went there recently. The forest itself, though of good quality, had nothing new to add, but there is a cleared power line right-of-way through the forest which produced 4 county records, including a species I had not encountered before.

What made the clearing unusual was its sand soil.

What made the clearing unusual was its sand soil.

The nearly pure sand hosted oddities including velvet ants and a tiger beetle much larger than most species of my acquaintance. Almost right away I found my new friend, the woodland meadow katydid, and after a while ran across a species that may prove to be a frequent associate, at least in this region, as Lisa Rainsong has suggested.

A male straight-lanced meadow katydid.

A male straight-lanced meadow katydid.

There were large numbers of band-winged grasshoppers (the subfamily of grasshoppers which have wing-rattling flight displays, and thus qualify as singing insects). These ultimately sorted out to three species. In addition to the ubiquitous, and large, Carolina grasshopper, there were a medium sized and a small species.

The medium sized one was the mottled sand grasshopper, which I mentioned in a recent post on Jasper County.

The medium sized one was the mottled sand grasshopper, which I mentioned in a recent post on Jasper County.

Mottled sand grasshoppers were the most abundant singing insects in the clearing, their yellow hind wings flashing all around me as I walked. Then I noticed smaller bursts of bright red, and they led me to a grasshopper which up to that moment had been on my hypothetical list for the region.

You can get a sense of the red colored wings, and the small size of this insect, in comparison to my thumbnail. As usual, I released it unharmed.

You can get a sense of the red colored wings, and the small size of this insect, in comparison to my thumbnail. As usual, I released it unharmed.

The head and pronotum are beautifully patterned.

The head and pronotum are beautifully patterned.

This is the longhorn band-winged grasshopper, Psinidia fenestralis.

This is the longhorn band-winged grasshopper, Psinidia fenestralis.

The unusually wide black zone of the hind wing, the long, flattened antennae, and the banded yellow and black tibias, are additional features of this species. Old records placed it in the dune areas around the edge of Lake Michigan, so this well-inland site is unusual.

 

Some Hoosier Grasshoppers

by Carl Strang

As I mentioned in the last post, grasshoppers pose problems different from other groups of singing insects. First, most of them don’t qualify as singing insects. Second, those that sing seldom do. Surveying them therefore must be on a visual rather than a hearing basis. Finally, even the visual approach isn’t simple. There are a lot of grasshopper species, sometimes distinguished by tiny structural features. A complete series of photos may be needed to assure an identification. You need every view, above, below, from the side, being sure to get good dorsal and lateral views of the end of the abdomen. Band-winged grasshoppers need to be captured and the wings spread. Also, the color of the hind tibia often is important. All of this was the lesson from grasshopper photos I took in Jasper, Pulaski and Starke Counties, Indiana, last week.

Some grasshoppers are relatively large and spectacular. The bird grasshoppers are the largest I have found to date in the region.

This appears to be the obscure bird grasshopper, common in places at the Jasper-Pulaski wildlife area but at or near the north end of its range.

This appears to be the obscure bird grasshopper, common in places at the Jasper-Pulaski wildlife area but at or near the north end of its range.

This is a different bird grasshopper from Round Lake conservation area, my best sorting of characters pointing to the spotted or prairie bird grasshopper, Schistocerca emarginata (S. lineata in older references). Note the different colors of the head and tibia, compared to the preceding species.

This is a different bird grasshopper from Round Lake conservation area, my best sorting of characters pointing to the spotted or prairie bird grasshopper, Schistocerca emarginata (S. lineata in older references). Note the different colors of the head and tibia, compared to the preceding species.

The remaining grasshoppers I photographed apparently are all in the enormous spur-throated grasshopper group. Their identifications I think are correct, but a few more photos of certain parts of them would have helped.

The graceful grasshopper, Melanoplus gracilis, is the one of these I most likely have right. It lives in moist grassy areas.

The graceful grasshopper, Melanoplus gracilis, is the one of these I most likely have right. It lives in moist grassy areas.

This may be a post oak grasshopper, Dendrotettix quercus. I found it in a dry oak savanna. Superficially it resembles the previous, but note the different wings.

This may be a post oak grasshopper, Dendrotettix quercus. I found it in a dry oak savanna. Superficially it resembles the previous, but note the different wings.

After poring through many reference photos, I had to conclude that this was a two-striped grasshopper. If I had looked at its back, I wouldn’t have needed to go to the trouble.

After poring through many reference photos, I had to conclude that this was a two-striped grasshopper. If I had looked at its back, I wouldn’t have needed to go to the trouble.

This grasshopper, like the previous one, didn’t give me a dorsal view, but I’m pretty sure it’s another two-striped.

This grasshopper, like the previous one, didn’t give me a dorsal view, but I’m pretty sure it’s another two-striped.

More J-P Singers

by Carl Strang

The woodland meadow katydids were the highlight of last week’s exploration of Jasper-Pulaski wildlife area in Indiana, as I described in the last post. It was a productive day, and I came out with 16 new county records for singing insects in the two counties. For example, I have not had a lot of success in the past with finding straight-lanced meadow katydids, but turned them up in both counties on Wednesday.

The females of this Conocephalus species have ovipositors longer than their bodies.

The females of this Conocephalus species have ovipositors longer than their bodies.

Males have cerci with relatively long straight ends beyond the spurs.

Males have cerci with relatively long straight ends beyond the spurs.

Finding singing grasshoppers requires a different methodology from those used for other singing insects. They sing so seldom that they need to be searched out visually. This approach resulted in two species at J-P.

The mottled sand grasshopper is amazingly camouflaged. I found it by flushing it into flight.

The mottled sand grasshopper is amazingly camouflaged. I found it by flushing it into flight.

As in most of our members of the band-winged grasshopper subfamily, the mottled sand grasshopper has strikingly colored hind wings.

As in most of our members of the band-winged grasshopper subfamily, the mottled sand grasshopper has strikingly colored hind wings.

The other singing grasshopper subfamily is the slant-faced stridulator group.

Short-winged green grasshoppers are common at J-P.

Short-winged green grasshoppers are common at J-P.

The males usually are green on top and brown on the sides, the larger females more completely green.

The males usually are green on top and brown on the sides, the larger females more completely green.

 

A final post from this area will focus on a variety of grasshoppers from non-singing subfamilies.

Woodland Meadow Katydid

by Carl Strang

Sometimes the solution to a puzzle comes through a tiny clue, accidentally discovered. Why couldn’t I find woodland meadow katydids? For years I had listened for them and looked for them in habitats where they are supposed to occur. References suggested I should be able to hear their distinctive song around woodland edges, but also indicated they are more a southern species with only scattered populations as far north as the 22-county region I am surveying for singing insects.

On Wednesday I traveled to Jasper County, Indiana, and stopped at the western end of the Jasper-Pulaski state wildlife area. I put on the SongFinder, wanting to find short-winged meadow katydids to add to the Jasper County list, but almost immediately heard something odd. It sounded like a striped ground cricket, but perhaps lower in pitch.

The song was coming from the tall herbaceous vegetation around two white oak trees.

The song was coming from the tall herbaceous vegetation around two white oak trees.

I took off the headphones of the pitch-lowering device, and could no longer hear the song. As I continued to listen, I noticed that once in a while one of the quick short buzzes was preceded by a brief stuttering burst of ticks. Thanks to the stereophonic design of the SongFinder, I soon found the singer.

A male woodland meadow katydid!

A male woodland meadow katydid!

It’s the only dry-habitat meadow katydid in our area that is brown rather than green. Once I knew that I needed the SongFinder, and what to listen for, I found them in Pulaski County and, the next day, in Starke. At the Round Lake state conservation area I heard males singing, and spotted a female.

Though the ovipositor is slightly curved, the small size as well as the brown color separates this female from all the Orchelimum meadow katydids. Long-tailed meadow katydids can be brown, but have very long straight ovipositors and live in wetlands.

Though the ovipositor is slightly curved, the small size as well as the brown color separates this female from all the Orchelimum meadow katydids. Long-tailed meadow katydids can be brown, but have very long straight ovipositors and live in wetlands.

I had held out hope that this would prove to be the one Conocephalus meadow katydid that I could hear unaided, but such is not the case. That was the tiny clue I needed to solve the woodland meadow katydid puzzle.

Mayslake Update

by Carl Strang

Photos from Mayslake Forest Preserve have been accumulating, so today’s post covers a miscellany. Two of the subjects were additions to the preserve’s species list. I have been there for more than 5 years, so this testifies to the dynamism of that ecosystem.

The two-striped grasshopper is distinctive enough that I should have noticed it before if it were any kind of significant presence.

The two-striped grasshopper is distinctive enough that I should have noticed it before if it were any kind of significant presence.

This view shows how the grasshopper got its name. Notice the bright red tibias.

This view shows how the grasshopper got its name. Notice the bright red tibias.

The other new species was a turtle.

Though this large map turtle was sunning at Mays’ Lake, it’s a short crawl from Trinity Lake, which is much more extensive and would account for my not having observed this critter before.

Though this large map turtle was sunning at Mays’ Lake, it’s a short crawl from Trinity Lake, which is much more extensive and would account for my not having observed this critter before.

The remaining photos are of organisms I have seen before at the preserve, but are uncommon.

Swamp rose mallow is hard to miss.

Swamp rose mallow is hard to miss.

The tiny skimming bluet always is a delight.

The tiny skimming bluet always is a delight.

The spotted spreadwing, a relatively late-season species, signals that summer is on the wane.

The spotted spreadwing, a relatively late-season species, signals that summer is on the wane.

 

McHenry County Exploration

by Carl Strang

On Friday I took a vacation day to check out some sites in McHenry County for their singing insect potential. I saw parts of 4 widely scattered Conservation Areas (their equivalent of Forest Preserves), and picked up 4 county records for my study along the way.

Within minutes of arriving at the first site, Elizabeth Lake, I spotted this bush katydid feeding on a tansy flower head.

Within minutes of arriving at the first site, Elizabeth Lake, I spotted this bush katydid feeding on a tansy flower head.

The small body size, and the shape of the ovipositor, identified this female as a fork-tailed bush katydid.

The small body size, and the shape of the ovipositor, identified this female as a fork-tailed bush katydid.

That was not one of the county records, but I did pick up two at that site: Forbes’s tree cricket, and slender meadow katydid.

The area with the greatest potential proved to be Hickory Grove-Lyons. These areas are a political oddity. Though the Lyons portion is in Lake County, it is cut off by a bend of the Fox River, and so managed by the McHenry County Conservation District.

A boardwalk leads through a high quality marsh at Hickory Grove. Other marshes and woodlands in this, and the adjacent Lyons area, are priorities for future exploration.

A boardwalk leads through a high quality marsh at Hickory Grove. Other marshes and woodlands in this, and the adjacent Lyons area, are priorities for future exploration.

The year’s first Texas bush katydids, which also provided a county record, were singing in that marsh. The fourth county record, common true katydid (which seems oddly uncommon in McHenry), came at a good-looking forested preserve, Coral Woods. I look forward to return visits to some of these sites.

 

Dancing Flies

by Carl Strang

A program had me at Kline Creek Farm early one morning last week. While waiting at the parking lot for others to arrive, I noticed a swarm of small flies engaged in what I took to be a courtship dance. They were in the light at the edge of a tree-cast shadow, and they remained in the vertical plane defined by that edge, within an altitude range of about 5-8 feet, the zone parallel to the ground and around 20 feet long. Each fly followed a roller-coaster or sine-wave flight path, turning around when it reached each end of the zone.  They were going too fast to follow easily, and I had no net with me. I took a few photos.

The flies could be seen clearly only when backlit. Each bright dot is a different fly.

The flies could be seen clearly only when backlit. Each bright dot is a different fly.

The flies in focus in each photo had similar shapes. Here are two examples:

There is a large spot in the middle, and two lines at each side. The shutter speed is 1/1000 second.

There is a large spot in the middle, and two lines at each side. The shutter speed is 1/1000 second.

Often there were additional projections above and below.

Often there were additional projections above and below.

There is a family of flies called dance flies, the Empididae. They are famous in ethological circles for the nuptial gifts offered by males to females. In some species the pattern is regarded as more primitive, and the gift is a prey item. In others the male wraps the prey in silk. At the other end of the spectrum are species in which the male creates a balloon of silk, and this has replaced the prey entirely. Were the photographed flies members of this family? I do not know. Empidids have bulbous thoraxes, which would account for the bright central spot in the photos. The abdomen is thin, and the long central line could be a highlight, with the wings similarly indicated by the lines to each side. The thicker line below could be the dangling long legs, or perhaps the long proboscis that some species of empidids possess, if these were in fact empidids. Whatever they were, they were fascinating to watch. The shadow-edge convention provides a standardized meeting site, reminiscent of hilltopping butterflies. I found the up-and-down motion of the individual flies hypnotic, the experience delightful.

Confused

by Carl Strang

This year there seem to be more confused ground crickets than I have noticed before in DuPage and neighboring counties. Furthermore, their habitat range seems broader. Here is a case in point. A couple weeks ago I was paying the year’s first visit to Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in Will County. Across one of the interior roads from a grove of trees was a meadow undergoing restoration to prairie, and in that meadow edge a confused ground cricket was singing.

This was the opposite of the species’ typical woodland setting.

This was the opposite of the species’ typical woodland setting.

I moved in closer to see exactly where the cricket was and found, between the bases of the plants, a little pocket of accumulated cottonwood leaves from last year.

This apparently was sufficient microhabitat to suit him.

This apparently was sufficient microhabitat to suit him.

There have been plenty of other instances of meadows with confused ground crickets in DuPage, Will and Kendall Counties. Almost always there are at least scattered trees nearby. The song is distinctive enough that I don’t think it’s a matter of me missing them in the past. Whether this is a 1-year increase, the result perhaps of favorable winter conditions, remains to be seen. This area is close to the northern range boundary for confused ground crickets, so another possibility is that this is evidence of yet another range expansion from the south.

Confused ground cricket

Confused ground cricket

Another sound-location combination that surprised me happened last week. I was driving home from an evening walk at Danada Forest Preserve when I heard what seemed to be a robust conehead, within 2 miles of my home on a road I frequently drive. I turned around, parked, and found it.

Robust conehead from a previous year

Robust conehead from a previous year

It was indeed a robust conehead, practically deafening at close range and with the typical short cone lacking black coloration. A second male sang nearby. These were far from the only DuPage County population I know about. This was, however, in a section of Butterfield Road that was rebuilt in the past few years, and there has been much landscaping in the median and along both edges. It seems almost certain that the eggs from which these coneheads hatched were carried in on nursery material. I’ll be interested in seeing if a new disjunct population builds in that spot.

 

More Mayslake Insects

by Carl Strang

Today, some recent photos of insects from Mayslake Forest Preserve.

Broad-winged bush katydid, July 26

Broad-winged bush katydid, July 26

Broad-winged bush katydids have been a personal challenge to photograph. They are very good at staying out of sight, and quick to flush when they know they have been seen. This one was on the move, making it easier to spot, and I was able to go slowly enough to get in a couple shutter clicks.

The red hind tibias are striking. They don’t seem to occur on every individual, but from photos made by others, and my own few observations, they seem to appear in this species more than others.

The red hind tibias are striking. They don’t seem to occur on every individual, but from photos made by others, and my own few observations, they seem to appear in this species more than others.

The banded longhorn beetle closely resembles Strangalia luteicornis, which also recently has been visiting Queen Anne’s lace.

Note the black antennae and thorax, and the more stripe-like elytra markings.

Note the black antennae and thorax, and the more stripe-like elytra markings.

Here is Strangalia, for comparison.

Here is Strangalia, for comparison.

Like Strangalia, the adult banded longhorns visit flowers, but this one is more a woodland species rather than woods edges, and its larvae live in decaying trees. Despite the superficial similarity, it is in a different genus.

Another longhorned beetle, Batyle suturalis, like so many adults in its family, feeds on pollen.

The larvae of this one most commonly bore oak and hickory trees.

The larvae of this one most commonly bore oak and hickory trees.

The seven-spotted lady beetle was imported from Eurasia for aphid control.

Seven-spotted lady beetle. The odd number of spots comes about from the forward most spot, which forms from a half on each elytron.

Seven-spotted lady beetle. The odd number of spots comes about from the forward most spot, which forms from a half on each elytron.

The introduced lady beetles have proven to be problematic, their competitive and possibly predatory activity driving down our native lady beetle species.

The final two insects are Hymenoptera.

This little wasp, Euodynerus hidalgo, is a solitary species. The females nest in holes in wood or in the ground, partitioning them with fine soil and feeding their young with paralyzed caterpillars.

This little wasp, Euodynerus hidalgo, is a solitary species. The females nest in holes in wood or in the ground, partitioning them with fine soil and feeding their young with paralyzed caterpillars

I am accustomed to seeing cicada killers, which indeed capture cicadas to feed their young, in sand soil regions. Where these are finding soil soft enough to dig their nursery tunnels at Mayslake is a bit of a mystery.

Eastern cicada killer, the 200th insect species I have observed on the preserve.

Eastern cicada killer, the 200th insect species I have identified on the preserve.

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