Singing Insects Guide 2018

by Carl Strang

The general summary of my singing insects research is a 116-page guide, Singing Insects of the Chicago Region. It contains photos, maps, links to song recordings, and information with a page for each species. It is available for free as a 5-6mb PDF document, sent as an e-mail attachment.

This Texas bush katydid continues as the cover photo.

If you are on the mailing list, you should have received the updated version earlier this month. To get a copy and get on the list for annual updates, send me a request at wildlifer@aol.com

This year’s version is expanded significantly, as I created pages for species which occurred historically in the region but which I have not yet found. I also added photos of museum specimens in cases where I have no photos of live insects, and have a new page for the eastern striped cricket, which I found for the first time in 2017. Already I know that I will need to add a page in next year’s version, as Nancy Collins has sent me documentation of a 2005 find of tamarack tree crickets in Berrien County.

The long-term plan is to continue this annual updating through 2024, when periodical cicadas have their next major emergence in the region. Then I will see about getting a print version made. In the meantime, if you have need for a higher-resolution photo than the compressed (but adequate, I think) versions in the guide, send a request to that same e-mail address.

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Pilot Mountain

by Carl Strang

On the way to visit my brother and his family in eastern North Carolina for Christmas, I made a stop at Pilot Mountain State Park in the western part of that state. Pilot Mountain is an isolated peak that rises 1500 feet above the surrounding terrain (against only 2 miles’ diameter at the base), and its striking profile is visible from miles away in all directions. My route takes me right past it, and a quick entry is available from that interstate highway.

There are two high points, and you can drive to the top of the lower of those.

This view from the top gives a sense of Pilot Mountain’s dramatic rise.

The sides of this quartzite-cored peak are forested. White, red and chestnut oaks were the dominant trees in the part of the forest I explored.

A nice network of trails wraps around the park.

As a biologist, I was especially interested in the wildlife.

The deer and the gray squirrels looked small as compared to those in northern Illinois. This probably is a latitude effect rather than a peculiarity of the park.

My eyes scanned the trail from time to time, and I was pleased to see some bobcat tracks, but those were dwarfed by a few footprints that had been made by something much larger.

This was the clearest example. At 3-4 inches in diameter, with a circular overall outline and lacking toenail marks, it was close to mountain lion tracks I have seen out West.

Here is an example from Big Bend National Park, Texas.

I passed on my observation to the park staff. A little internet searching revealed that the presence of mountain lions in western North Carolina is debated. I believe my identification is correct, but this does not mean that there is a resident population with Pilot Mountain in a lion’s home range. Our experience in the Midwest is that mountain lions have been wandering outward from the Black Hills, several states away. One was killed in Chicago a few years ago. These cats, though big, are wary and capable of staying out of sight. I would not be surprised at all if eventually it is established that the mountainous region of western North Carolina and surrounding states harbors a resident population of this large predator.

 

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