2019 Bioblitz

by Carl A. Strang

Each year the Indiana Academy of Science co-hosts a bioblitz somewhere in that state. This year’s site was The Center at Donaldson, which includes a retreat center and Ancilla College, plus surrounding properties. I always take the singing insects in this annual 24-hour count of species, but no one came to cover Lepidoptera or Odonata in 2019, so I appended them to my commitment. That is just as well, because these events are scheduled early enough in the season that few singing insects have reached the adult stage.

Some Roesel’s katydids matured in time for the bioblitz.

Two of the five singing insect species I found were common early species that were nearly finished, two were common mid-season species recently coming into song, and one of them provided an observation of significance. The eastern striped cricket is thinly scattered in northwest Indiana, possibly expanding into that region from the south or west. A single male singing in the evening provided a Marshall County record, a full county’s width farther east than I have observed them before.

I enjoyed re-acquainting myself with the beauty of dragonflies, damselflies, butterflies and moths, and photographed many of them.

The widow skimmer was the most abundant dragonfly.

Most of the eastern or common pondhawks still were green. Males will change to blue over time.

The Halloween pennant pleases the eye.

There weren’t many damselflies. Here, a blue-fronted dancer.

Newly emerged eastern forktail females are orange.

A few monarchs graced the grounds.

There were many great spangled fritillaries, plus this meadow fritillary.

I encountered a few moths during the day, but most came to my ultraviolet light setup in the forest, or the Purdue team’s assorted bright lights in the open. Moths are underappreciated for their beauty, diversity, and ecological significance.

Large lace-border, Scopula limboundata

Reversed haploa, Haploa reversa

Painted lichen moth, Hypoprepia fucosa

Delicate cycnia, Cycnia tenera

Isabella tiger moth, Pyrrharctia Isabella

Imperial moth, Eacles imperialis

Hermit sphinx, Lintneria eremitus

Snowy-shouldered acleris, Acleris nivisellana

Oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana

Grape leaffolder, Desmia funeralis

Grape plume moth, Geina periscelidactylus

Large maple spanworm, Prochoerodes lineola

Lesser maple spanworm, Macaria pustularia

Small engrailed, Ectropis crepuscularia

Ovate dagger, Acronicta ovata

Pink-barred pseudostrotia, Pseudostrotia carneola

The Hebrew, Polygrammate hebraeicum

The brother, Raphia frater

Along the way I encountered a few other species to add to the species count.

Narrow-winged grasshoppers were common on the bioblitz base camp’s sandy hill.

A Pennsylvania wood cockroach came to the UV light.

The light also drew this striking summer fishfly.

 

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A Mystery Solved: Miogryllus!

by Carl Strang

In 2014 I first heard what sounded to my ear like a singing striped ground cricket, but it seemed too early in the season. It was June 21, at Hoosier Prairie Nature Preserve in Lake County, Indiana. I made a recording, then moved on to the Indiana Kankakee Sands, where I heard it again. Though these sites are a bit south of my DuPage County home, I didn’t hear striped ground crickets in DuPage until July 13. The next year I heard the same odd songs, this time at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, in the middle of Will County, immediately south of DuPage. This was even earlier, on June 10. Again I made a recording. And again, I did not hear striped ground crickets in DuPage until, as it happened, July 13. In 2016 I went down to Midewin on June 28, and heard the same early, striped-ground-cricket like songs. This year, the same story, Midewin, June 23. This time, though, it seemed to me that the songs were not quite right for striped ground crickets. They seemed too precise, too even and strong. Here is a recording I made in the same location on June 28:

I went back and listened to my earlier recordings, reviewed my list of hypothetical singing insect species for the Chicago region, then checked reference recordings of their songs. The early songs did sound different from my recordings of later-season striped ground crickets, an example here:

The odd, early songs seemed to be a match for one of the hypotheticals, the eastern striped cricket, Miogryllus verticalis. Furthermore, references indicated that M. verticalis is an early season species, most abundant in June. I drove back down to Midewin on June 28. Trying to zero in on the singers was very frustrating; they seemed to have a ventriloquial quality. Eventually I flushed out and captured a female cricket near one of the singing mystery males. Looking through the clear plastic cup that held her, I could see that she was indeed an eastern striped cricket. I took a couple photos looking down into the cup. It was well that I did, because when I tried to get her positioned for a shot from the side, she gave me the slip and I was unable to recapture her.

Female eastern striped cricket, dorsal view

She was just a little smaller than a spring field cricket, which species was sharing the grassy meadow where Miogryllus were abundant. This confirms that eastern striped crickets are established in the southwestern portion of the 22-county area I define as the Chicago region. They would seem to represent yet another example of a range extension northward by a singing insect species.

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