Japanese Burrowing Crickets Spreading Rapidly

by Carl Strang

The Japanese burrowing cricket is, as the name suggests, an oriental species that was accidentally introduced to this country at one or more coastal ports. They have spread out from there, and I first encountered them in the Chicago region at Bendix Woods, a St. Joseph County park, in 2014.

Japanese burrowing cricket, Velarifictorus micado

Since then I have found them increasingly at sites throughout the southern portion of the Chicago region.

Counties of the Chicago region, with years when I first observed Japanese burrowing crickets in each.

Fulton County, at the southeast corner of the region, is the most remote from my home, so I don’t go there often. I rather imagine that Japanese burrowing crickets are in the city of Rochester, at least.

Note that I added 7 counties this year. This is in part because they are increasing in the region, and in part because I encountered them frequently while ditch hopping (more on that in later posts). Rural drainage ditches may be major dispersal corridors, along with human-assisted transport in landscape and building materials. The crickets also may fly to expand their range, but this possibility remains speculative.

Japanese burrowing crickets have been ubiquitous and abundant in Indianapolis for years. Last year I found them to be common in Rensselaer, Indiana, one of the southernmost cities of the Chicago region. There is every reason to believe that they will become abundant through most or all of the region over the next decade. They thrive in loose landscaping stone and in lawns, which are not prime habitat for our other members of the field cricket group, so it is possible there will be little effect on our native species.

Here is the most common calling song of the Japanese burrowing cricket:

Perhaps less commonly heard is this alternative:

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