More Range Jumps

by Carl Strang

One recurring theme of my singing insects survey work is the northward extension of species’ ranges. Late in this year’s field season, three more species turned up significantly north of where I had found them before. One of these discoveries was made by Nancy Collins, who found broad-winged tree crickets (Oecanthus latipennis) half a county north of the Illinois border in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, more than 30 miles beyond where I had found them before.

Broad-winged tree cricket

I had not found this species in the northernmost row of Illinois counties, but I hadn’t looked for them there in recent years. Inspired by Nancy’s discovery, I did some searching and found them in Lake County at Chain O’Lakes State Park. Next year I want to seek them in McHenry County, Illinois, and Walworth and Racine Counties, Wisconsin (unless, of course, Nancy finds them there first).

The handsome trig (Phyllopalpus pulchellus) surprised me last year by turning up in sites across the southern half of my home county of DuPage in Illinois.

Handsome trig

I set the modest goal this year of seeking them in Kane County, just west of DuPage. Recently I succeeded in that, finding a group of them a little west of where I had found them in DuPage, but that was not surprising. What bowled me over was finding a small population of them in the East Main Street Prairie park in Cary. This is 22 miles, more than half a county, farther north, McHenry County being just north of Kane. This continued the pattern of handsome trigs popping up in separate scattered locations, because I tried to find them in northern Kane County and western Lake County, areas not far from Cary, without success.

The third species is one I have written about several times before, because it is spreading quickly, and soon becomes abundant in areas behind the front of its expansion. This is the jumping bush cricket (Orocharis saltator).

Jumping bush cricket

Last year I encountered a small population of jumping bush crickets in Wauconda, Lake County, Illinois. This was a good 12 miles north of where I had found them before. I still suspect that these were inadvertently transported there by people, and I wondered if they could reproduce successfully. Indeed there were even more males singing in that spot this year. The surprise was finding them in towns all along the west bank of the Fox River, nearly to the northern border of Kane County. This is a few miles south of Wauconda’s latitude, but a search of the southeastern corner of McHenry County, between the two locations, failed to turn them up. To be continued in future years…

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Berrien Explorations

by Carl Strang

The end of August found me in Berrien County, Michigan. The first stop was the Butternut Creek Fen preserve, where I met tree cricket specialist Nancy Collins. We spent an afternoon and evening seeking tamarack tree crickets, which had been found there years ago. There are abundant tamarack trees, but we were puzzled by the crickets’ no-show. None sang, and hours of arm-tiring sweeping of foliage with long-handled nets, as well as visual scanning of branches, were fruitless. We found other species, though, and provided the site owners with a list of what we observed.

When Nancy found this fork-tailed bush katydid I was hopeful that it would prove to be a rarer cousin, the treetop bush katydid, but no dice.

Oblong-winged katydids also are at the site. My new white chamber setup worked well in the back of the car.

The next day I wandered in Berrien, St. Joseph and LaPorte Counties. The best find was a new site for me, Glassman Park in Berrien County. I bypassed some nice-looking forest, then was captured by a mundane looking grassy area adjacent to the I-94 right-of-way. It proved to have some interesting grasshoppers.

Most of these proved to be pasture grasshoppers, only the second population of this locally distributed species I have found in my study region.

A second species had a much different look.

The handsome grasshopper has an even more slant-faced profile.

With a color pattern like this, the handsome grasshopper is well named.

The day was my final in Berrien County for 2018, but there is more singing insect work to be done there in coming years. That is bound to include at least one more listening stop at Butternut Creek.

 

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