Photos May-July

by Carl Strang

It’s been a busy field season, and I have fallen way behind in blog posts. I’ll catch up eventually, but today will share a smorgasbord of photos from May through July.

This barred owl appeared during a walk through St. James Farm Forest Preserve. I believe I had come close to its nest tree.

This barred owl appeared during a walk through St. James Farm Forest Preserve. I believe I had come close to its nest tree.

Here is the first slender spreadwing I have found at St. James Farm.

Here is the first slender spreadwing I have found at St. James Farm.

Wild yam graces the understory of the St. James Farm forest.

Wild yam graces the understory of the St. James Farm forest.

Sporangia on the underside of a lady fern leaf at St. James Farm.

Sporangia on the underside of a lady fern leaf at St. James Farm.

The Lulu Lake Nature Preserve in Walworth County, Wisconsin, has become a favorite site. Here a woodland graces a kame.

The Lulu Lake Nature Preserve in Walworth County, Wisconsin, has become a favorite site. Here a woodland graces a kame.

An eight-spotted forester provided a photo op in the nature preserve portion of the Round Lake state property in Starke County, Indiana.

An eight-spotted forester provided a photo op in the nature preserve portion of the Round Lake state property in Starke County, Indiana.

This dragonfly I encountered at Houghton Lake in Marshall County, Indiana, was a bit of a puzzler. I eventually concluded it was a somewhat odd widow skimmer.

This dragonfly I encountered at Houghton Lake in Marshall County, Indiana, was a bit of a puzzler. I eventually concluded it was a somewhat odd widow skimmer, but later changed the ID to slaty skimmer (see comments).

 

Advertisements

Odonata Appearances

by Carl Strang

Additional insect species continue to make their first appearances of the year at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Last week brought the first widow skimmer.

This is a teneral, or newly emerged, individual. Note the faint undeveloped dark wing areas.

I remember learning to recognize these years ago, finally releasing my focus on wing pattern as I discovered the suspenders-like yellow body striping.

I still haven’t internalized the differences among spreadwing damselflies, and try to photograph every one I see.

Females like this slender spreadwing I find particularly challenging. The pale wingtip veins are a big help here.

One fun photographic challenge is to get pictures of dragonflies in flight.

Some, like the prince baskettail, never seem to land, so flight photos are the only choice most of the time.

Though insects continue to appear early, there are plenty still to emerge as the season is yet young.

%d bloggers like this: