Bioblitz Species Hunt

by Carl Strang

Yesterday I introduced last weekend’s bioblitz at Connor Prairie in Indiana. My focus as a bioblitz participant is on singing insects, of course, but those are few early in June, even as far south as Indianapolis. Not to worry, though. There were teams focusing on many groups of organisms, but others had no specialists to address them, so I enjoyed filling in where I could. Odonata were one such group.

Twelve-spotted skimmer

Twelve-spotted skimmer

Powdered dancer

Powdered dancer

After much pondering, I concluded this was a female cobra clubtail. Indiana has a similar species, the handsome clubtail, but certain details ruled it out.

After much pondering, I concluded this was a female cobra clubtail. Indiana has a similar species, the handsome clubtail, but certain details ruled it out.

For instance, the C-shaped line at the top of the side of the thorax is connected, and apparently too thick for a handsome clubtail.

For instance, the C-shaped line at the top of the side of the thorax is connected, and apparently too thick for a handsome clubtail.

I also saw three bumblebee species.

Bombus fervidus was an easy ID.

Bombus fervidus was an easy ID.

There was a butterfly team, but I took advantage of photo ops that presented themselves.

Variegated fritillary

Variegated fritillary

Nevertheless, my main interest was singing insects. I found 4 species, and botany team leader Scott Namestnik added a 5th.

Green-striped grasshoppers were common, as were spring field crickets.

Green-striped grasshoppers were common, as were spring field crickets.

I saw a single sulfur-winged grasshopper. Scott ran across a pocket of Roesel’s katydid nymphs. Connor Prairie is about even with the Crawfordsville area where I found Roesel’s a couple years ago. So far, none have turned up farther south in Indiana.

The final species is worth a blog post all its own (to be continued).

Update

by Carl Strang

Circumstances have prevented me from gathering much new blog material for the past week and a half, but I hope to have more to share soon. The bird migration continues, but there’s only one photo in the hopper.

White-crowned sparrow, Mayslake Forest Preserve

White-crowned sparrow, Mayslake Forest Preserve

As for singing insects, the first few spring field crickets began singing in Marshall County, Indiana, last week, but I have yet to hear any farther north (DuPage County, Illinois).

The one significant new development came yesterday, as I was running the trails at Herrick Lake Forest Preserve. A grasshopper flew up from the trail in the large meadow of the preserve’s southeast corner. It had hind wings that were bright yellow with broad black edges. This was the first opportunity to take advantage of my recent literature research on possible new singing grasshoppers. It turns out there is only one band-winged grasshopper with that color pattern that matures so early in the season, the sulfur-winged grasshopper (Arphia sulfurea), and so I can already shift one species from the hypothetical list to the verified list for the region.

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