Assorted Photos 2

by Carl Strang

Today I’ll share photos of some colorful insects. Fiery skippers are described in references as a southern species that sometimes appears in the North. It seems to me, though, that a year seldom goes by when I fail to see them.

I have seen fiery skippers several times at Mayslake Forest Preserve this year. This one’s on sneezeweed.

With summer waning away, it’s appropriate to begin seeing autumn meadowhawks.

AKA yellow-legged meadowhawks, for obvious reasons.

Finally I want to focus on some very small insects. They are tiny, but so abundant this year that it’s been impossible to overlook them. The shiny black beetles, each at most a couple millimeters long, first showed up in sweep nets the kids were swinging at the Forest Preserve District’s employee parent-child event at Mayslake in August. Then they were mainly in Queen Anne’s lace flowers. Lately they have shifted to goldenrods.

They plunge their heads into the little florets of this Canada goldenrod.

Their simple hump-backed oval shape, shiny elytra, and abundance all made it seem likely they should be common enough to find in references. I tried probing them, and they showed no jumping talent, so I ruled out flea beetles. I found a likely match while scanning photos representing the various families of beetles in the BugGuide website. They appear to be members of the shining flower beetle family, Phalacridae. One common genus is Olibrus.

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