St. James Farm is Singing

by Carl Strang

Birds poured into St. James Farm Forest Preserve in mid-May as the wave crest of neotropical migrants pushed through northern Illinois. On some days, sorting through the many songs to note visiting species was a challenge.

Not all were singing, though, for example this bald eagle that stopped in the restored stream corridor.

Not all were singing, though, for example this bald eagle that stopped in the restored stream corridor.

Blue-gray gnatcatchers are common on the preserve, and are among the earliest nesters.

Blue-gray gnatcatchers are common on the preserve, and are among the earliest nesters.

I am hoping this hooded warbler, singing among the thicketed portions of the central forest, will find a mate and nest there.

I am hoping this hooded warbler, singing among the thicketed portions of the central forest, will find a mate and nest there.

I took that photo from a distance on a foggy day, not wanting to get too close and create a disturbance.

This sharp-shinned hawk was very vocal, its calls to my ear less like those of its relative the Cooper’s hawk and more like those of a shorebird.

This sharp-shinned hawk was very vocal, its calls to my ear less like those of its relative the Cooper’s hawk and more like those of a shorebird.

At one point, heavy rains flooded the stream well beyond its banks.

The engineered restoration corridor held up well to the challenge.

The engineered restoration corridor held up well to the challenge.

Among the water-loving birds that took advantage of this temporary habitat expansion was a double-crested cormorant, here taking a break between swims.

Among the water-loving birds that took advantage of this temporary habitat expansion was a double-crested cormorant, here taking a break between swims.

After the water receded, the deposited mud interested a few late shorebird migrants, including this least sandpiper.

After the water receded, the deposited mud interested a few late shorebird migrants, including this least sandpiper.

For other birds, the breeding season is well under way.

I am not sure where this goose brood came from, but they have found the restored stream corridor to their liking.

I am not sure where this goose brood came from, but they have found the restored stream corridor to their liking.

Among my happiest observations in the second half of May has been the discovery of two eastern bluebird nests in natural cavities.

Here the male stuffs food into unseen nestlings in a bur oak cavity.

Here the male stuffs food into unseen nestlings in a bur oak cavity.

Mom takes her turn. In just a few minutes I saw each parent make 3 such feeding trips.

Mom takes her turn. In just a few minutes I saw each parent make 3 such feeding trips.

The same story was repeated in a dead tree near the stream. I am relieved that not all bluebirds are dependent upon human-provided nest boxes.

A little earlier in their own cycle, a pair of red-headed woodpeckers has been setting up shop in another dead tree.

They have settled upon the lower of the two holes beside the foreground bird.

They have settled upon the lower of the two holes beside the foreground bird. (Clicking on any photo will blow it up for better viewing).

This pair energetically repelled another pair which expressed interest in their tree. I hope the other pair also will nest at St. James Farm.

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Dark-eyed Junco Species Dossier

by Carl Strang

We’ll soon say goodbye, for the summer, to our most familiar snowbirds, the dark-eyed juncos. Here are my notes on the species. This probably will also be the last dossier until next winter.

Junco, Dark-eyed

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

1986 initial summary: Juncos are common late fall, winter and early spring residents around Culver and West Lafayette, Indiana, south central Pennsylvania, and DuPage County, Illinois. They usually travel in flocks, and can be seen in any habitat. They have a follow-me signal in the form of white outer tail feathers that contrast with the dark central ones. They eat seeds, and feed almost exclusively on the ground or on elevated flat platforms in winter. The call note is 1 to 3 syllables (often 3): chi’-bi-dit’ (short I’s), very quick and chittering.

4OC86. First lone individual of fall, stayed around the Warrenville, Illinois, back yard for much of the day.

1987. Juncos still were present at Willowbrook on 6AP, and were singing by 16MR (trilling song), gone by 27AP.

24SE87. First juncos of fall have arrived, Morton Arboretum.

14MR88. Juncos maintain a constant chatter, foraging on and near ground, of minute twitters, trills, and complex combinations of soft notes, occasionally interacting more directly with little scuffles when one encroaches on another’s bit of feeding ground.

17MR88. Juncos singing a lot, Willowbrook Back 40.

20MR88. In east Meacham Grove, a large junco flock, as at Willowbrook very noisy with assorted twitterings, chasing, some singing. Birds were on the ground, in bushes and in trees.

21MR88. Willowbrook Back 40. Some juncos kick like fox sparrows, but not so loudly.

Spring 88. Flocks still present 30MR, gone by 5AP, a few individuals still present 8AP.

15OC88. First juncos of fall, at Red Oak Nature Center (near Batavia, IL).

Juncos most commonly are seen on the ground.

Juncos most commonly are seen on the ground.

18NO88. Willowbrook Back 40. I was watching a flock of juncos and listening to birdlife in general when a sharp-shin flew over, north to south. There was silence from the time it came into view to the time it passed from view. The juncos remained absolutely still, their twitterings and flutterings resuming after the hawk was gone. That hawk must have a quiet view of the world, just as police see orderly traffic when in their patrol cars.

9MR89. Juncos starting to sing, Willowbrook.

21MR89. Willowbrook Back 40. Considerable social activity on this clear but very cool day, among juncos. Some vigorous chasing, and in one case two birds feeding on ground close together, in what seemed to be a synchronized way. They appeared to be male and female. Warming up for start of breeding season? (Have been singing off and on for weeks, now).

21OC89. First junco of fall seen at West DuPage Woods Forest Preserve.

24SE91. First junco of fall seen at Willowbrook.

19FE99. Juncos starting to insert bits of song into their calls.

11MR99. Junco song a trill, sometimes varying in speed and with small chirps sometimes added before or after. Trill a bit more musical than the call. This morning at Willowbrook there are many juncos on the preserve, especially along the creek north of the bridge. They are foraging mainly up in the trees, also singing and chasing one another.

17MR99. Today another wave of juncos at Willowbrook. Some are appearing in places where I haven’t seen them all winter, so I’m inclined to regard them as new birds, migrants drifting north. Very active, like those on the 11th.

11OC99. First junco arrived at Willowbrook.

29JA00. Juncos along with Brewer’s blackbirds and others are at Fermilab buffalo feeders picking up spillage.

5FE00. Juncos common along roadsides near Culver.

22FE00. Willowbrook. First junco songs of the year (2 individuals).

10MR00. Willowbrook. Juncos singing regularly now. Today one fed from an open silver maple flower cluster.

13AP00. Willowbrook. Several juncos still present, have been there daily.

9MR01. This is the first day I’ve observed both singing and much chasing and other play-territorial behavior by juncos this year. A couple singers earlier in the season. It’s a much colder spring than last year, and there have been fewer juncos on the Willowbrook preserve.

30AU01. Juncos are in small groups at Algonquin Park, Ontario, usually associated with hemlock groves.

5OC10. Mayslake. Heard the first juncos of the season.

Mourning Dove Species Dossier

by Carl Strang

This week’s species dossier features a bird that is familiar and common. Over the course of my developing this dossier (established in the mid-1980’s) there seems to have been a change, with mourning doves wintering this far north with increasing frequency.

Dove, Mourning

Mourning dove

Mourning dove

Mourning doves usually live in open areas with some trees. In winter, they sometimes roost in thick evergreen plantations. They feed on the ground, picking up seeds. Nesting begins early in spring (March), with adults’ walking around, picking up sticks the first sign. Usually the first nest is in the branches of a conifer; subsequent nests may be in deciduous trees. The nest is a flimsy, loose platform of sticks. Two eggs almost always complete the clutch. Both adults incubate; early morning is a common switching time. The call is a mournful “cooweeoo, coo, coo-coo” (“bachelor song,” after literature). They produce a loud whistling of wings in flight. Generally they are not seen in northeast Illinois in winter, though occasional adults stick it out around feeders in Culver, Indiana. (Some were present all winter of 1998-9 at Willowbrook). There is a distinctive pumping of the head while walking. Mourning doves were very common in Texas, in brushlands, mountains and desert.

Mourning dove fledglings. This species lays 2 eggs per clutch.

Mourning dove fledglings. This species lays 2 eggs per clutch.

Late MY90, Hartz Lake. A mourning dove singing his bachelor song low in a tree flew off in a startle as a female sharp-shin landed in the same tree. The dove stayed within tree canopies as it flew.

27JA97. Morning. Snow fairly deep. A red-tailed hawk flew over the College of DuPage parking lot with something in its talons, pursued by half a dozen crows. The hawk perched on a flat-topped, wooden light pole and began plucking prey while crows sporadically left nearby perches and swooped at it. After 10-15 minutes it flew away, and I checked the feathers, which were scattered in singles and small clumps over a 20×30 foot area: mourning dove. Crow calls resembled owl mobbing, but smaller number of birds and less sustained.

MODO DE 3b

11MR99. First “bachelor calls” of the season at Willowbrook.

31OC01. At least 20 mourning doves, more than I have seen together in months in northeast Illinois, at a savanna area in the Nelson Lake property, Kane Co.

MODO DE 1b

18FE05. First bachelor calls of the season, Winfield Mounds.

Mourning dove incubating its nest

Mourning dove incubating its nest

30MR09. Mayslake. A pair of mourning doves has a nest in a spruce in front of the mansion. (This nest later was abandoned, possibly because of the heavy human traffic that was passing close by).

Mayslake Update

by Carl Strang

With the onset of winter, things have slowed at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Bird activity has diminished as the migration season winds down.

This sharp-shinned hawk was one of the later migrants to stop by the preserve.

Winter bird activity hasn’t quite settled into a consistent pattern.

A few blue jays continue to hang around, but they may yet move on if the winter turns frigid.

The weather itself has seemed indecisive. The lakes froze over about a week later than they did last year.

May’s Lake had an inch of ice on December 12.

Then we had renewed warmth, and heavy rains that opened the lakes again.

May’s Lake on December 15.

I look forward to expanding my collection of winter botany photos.

Recently I took some pictures of swamp milkweed.

The big push there will need to wait until there is snow on the ground to provide a contrasting backdrop.

Swamp milkweed in winter resembles some of the other milkweeds, but the pods are narrower and more delicate than common milkweed, but wider than those of butterfly weed. There’s also the habitat association.

Snow also will provide for easier tracking, and I’ll renew my acquaintance with the preserve’s mammal activities.

Cedar Waxwing Dossier

by Carl Strang

One delightful bird which can be seen in northeast Illinois throughout the year is the cedar waxwing. Today I share my dossier for the species, consisting entirely of my own observations. Though references are valuable it also is important, I think, to keep track of one’s own experiences with a species.

Cedar waxwings are smaller than robins but larger than sparrows, crested, soft brown and yellow in color with bright yellow follow-me bands on the tail tips.

Waxwing, Cedar

My principal childhood memory is of waxwings that nested around brushy thickets and willow clumps along the Tippecanoe River near Monterey, IN. Adults hunted insects in flycatcher fashion from bare twigs over the river. In DuPage County they are evident in wandering flocks through all parts of the year except the breeding season. They travel in flocks, staying one to many days in an area and feeding on berries in fall and winter. This also occurred in Cumberland County, PA. Mountain-ash berries were a favorite food in both places. Also consumed are dogwood, and buckthorn berries. Flock cohesion is aided by the bright-yellow tips of the tail feathers, and by the unique high-pitched thin contact call. First winter birds have breasts striped longitudinally with cream and the soft brown adults’ breast color. At the Willowbrook Wildlife Center clinic, waxwings frequently came in with broken wings and other injuries suffered in collisions with windows. In the cages they showed an open-mouthed threat display, possibly made more effective by the black facial markings. In mid-September at Herrick Lake, a single waxwing perched in an old-field treetop gave a single loud note and flew away into thicker trees. Several seconds later a sharp-shinned hawk flew by the waxwing’s original perch, heading in the same direction. (This first paragraph, written from memory, established the dossier in the early 1980’s. Subsequent additions begin with date codes.)

When not feeding, cedar waxwings typically perch high in trees.

30OC86. Willowbrook Back 40. Waxwings feeding heavily from honeysuckle (berries and leaves still on bushes).

16OC87. First autumn appearance of a flock at Willowbrook Back 40.

13JA88. Lots of waxwings in Back 40.

27OC88. Feeding on honeysuckle berries, Willowbrook Back 40.

13DE88. Waxwings abundant in Back 40, stuffing down rose hips.

3SE89. Mixed young and old waxwings eating honeysuckle berries, Island Park, Geneva.

JA99. Waxwing flocks frequently at Willowbrook. Eating, among other things, Asiatic bittersweet (Celastrus) berries.

11MR99. Last of winter waxwings noted. Not seen again at Willowbrook until 25MY. Then after 1JE another gap until 12&20JL. Became a frequent visitor again in early August.

These waxwings are drinking meltwater where snow is being warmed on a roof at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Much energy is saved by drinking, even if the water is cold, instead of eating snow.

7JA00. Waxwing eating buckthorn berries.

31JA00. Waxwing, again at Willowbrook, again eating buckthorn berries.

8FE00. Waxwings eating buckthorn berries at Willowbrook.

17FE00. Several waxwings on the ground eating snow (buckthorn berries available on bushes nearby).

19MY01. Many flocking waxwings spread out over a large area at the Arboretum, mainly in treetops in forest as well as more open areas.

12MR06. Cedar waxwings delicately picking anthers from silver maple flowers in the yard. [Note: studies have shown that waxwings use protein from pollen to render certain berries more digestible]

13JE06. Tri-County State Park. Cedar waxwing working on a nest in the topmost leaf cluster in a 25-30-foot box elder within 30 yards of Brewster Creek. Weaving, using long slender strands, at least some of which are stripped from grape vines. Spending considerable time with each strand. Mate perched in same cluster of trees. Bird completely concealed when weaving.

This is the tree where waxwings built a nest at (then) Tri-County State Park in 2006.

16JE06. The nest looks complete, a significant lump in the first branching of twigs about a foot from the tip.

22MY08. Fullersburg. An interesting display between 2 cedar waxwings, appears highly stereotyped. They were perched side by side well up in a tree in SW Butler Woods. They took turns quickly hopping away from the other bird a few inches, and returning, at which point the two birds touched or nearly touched beaks, which were angled up. Each of these cycles (or half-cycles, for each bird) took 1-2 seconds, and there were perhaps 20 reps that I observed (i.e. at least 10 per bird). At first they faced the same way, at some point one turned to face the other way and they continued. Eventually one moved to a different twig, but still was close. [Note: this is called the Side-hop display in the Stokes bird behavior guide, and is part of courtship].

6JL09 Mayslake. 14 cedar waxwings foraging like swallows out over May’s Lake. (This was repeated over several days.)

1JA10. Hidden Lake. Waxwings and robins feeding on buckthorn berries.

Black-capped Chickadee Dossier

by Carl Strang

I have mentioned black-capped chickadees from time to time in this blog, most notably when introducing the topic of mixed flocks. Today I want to share my dossier on this species. In my dossiers I try to summarize what I know of a species from my own observations, as opposed to information from the literature or other outside sources. I began writing the dossier in the mid-1980’s. Observations begin with my date codes.

Chickadee, Black-capped

Ca. 1979. I remember sitting on the hawk watch at Reineman Sanctuary in PA in fall and watching as a sharp-shinned hawk zipping along the ridge suddenly turned its course so as to enter the tree canopy and caught a chickadee.

Boiling Springs, PA, 1980. A pair nested in hollow Ailanthus branch. One bird was electrocuted by a nearby electric fence. The other completed incubation and at least began to rear the brood alone. “Cheeseburger” call (more formally known as the fee-bee call) used early as apparent territorial signal.

Lombard, IL, 1981. A pair nested in a wren house, raised a brood, then returned and raised a second brood in the same house. In both cases, the pair traveled the neighborhood with their groups of fledglings.

Maple Grove Forest Preserve (F.P.), 1986. A pair was cleaning out an old cavity in a 10 foot snag in the maple forest. The excavating bird periodically removed beaks full of sawdust. Other bird remained nearby, giving occasional “chickadee” contact call.

Meacham Grove F.P., 24MY86. For the first time, I saw a chickadee taking advantage of tortricids hidden in folded leaves. One individual moved from one folded leaf to the next, vigorously tearing them open. I expected to see it more frequently than I have, given the lack of other birds with the appropriate foraging behavior in their repertoire, and the abundance of this food resource.

Willowbrook F.P., 1984-86. Chickadees have broods in the wooded riparian strip each spring. One pair appears to control the entire 1/4 mi. X 100-foot strip. Groups of more than 2 chickadees stay together through the winter. “Chickittaperk” vocalization appears to be an interspecific agonistic (dispute) display.

Chickadees weren’t common in Culver, Indiana when I was growing up. I remember being pleasantly surprised that a pair was present, nesting, at Miracles’ house in summer. This implies they were more easily seen in winter, at the feeder. Old trees and branches were scarce in our neighborhood.

Alarm call: one used a sharp “chiburr,” another answered with the same call.

11FE87. Willowbrook. Widely scattered chickadees in the Back 40 old field are maintaining contact mainly via the feebee call.

28FE87. A group of a half-dozen chickadees in trees: much sneeze-calling and chick-chick-chick-chick, but few chickadee calls, with much chasing and displacement. Later, many individuals made chickadee calls from widely separated perches. Then a period of silence followed.

14MR87. Maple Grove F.P. Seven chickadees moved together with a mix of chickadee and sneeze calls, occasionally briefly chasing one another. The group spread out widely, then used very high-pitched brief “cheeks” for contact.

29AP87. Chickadee caught adult noctuid moth, pecked body (scales puffed into the air), removed wings one at a time and they drifted to the ground, landing at least 3 feet apart.

1JL87. Willowbrook F.P. Chickadee pecking at mulberries.

10SE87. 0.5-3 seconds per perch in foraging, flying or hopping a few inches to 6 feet or occasionally 10 feet between perches, acrobatic hanging or hover-gleaning, pecking at dried leaves, turning and lowering body almost to upside down position to peer different ways.

13SE87. At West DuPage Woods F.P., several chickadees in a mixed flock with a redstart and a bay-breasted warbler.

17JE89. A broad-winged hawk callied repeatedly, in north end of Maple Grove F.P. Jays, flickers and grackles were highly agitated, flickers the most continuously vocal with “keels” every 2 seconds (2 birds). Grackles gacking frequently, too. A great crested flycatcher near, also vocal, but not clearly in response to the hawk; same with chickadees. Robins definitely disturbed, with nervous dee-dee-dee’s every 20 seconds or so. Jays in bursts, with several birds mobbing.

10JE90. Warrenville Grove. Chickadee saw me at sit near edge of woods. Alarm call “chicka-chicka-…(rapid)-dee-dee-dee”

3JL90. Chickadee plucked 2 unripe (white) mulberries from the branches. Dropped the first, then went for the second. Worked on it several seconds, holding it against a twig with its toes. I couldn’t tell if it ate the whole berry or just extracted seeds. Suspect latter.

7SE90. 2 chickadees eating dried crabapples, eating, pulling out and eating little bites.

30SE90. Chickadee and downy woodpecker eating poison ivy berries at Ann’s business property near Lafayette.

8FE00. Chickadees heard singing for the first time of the year at Willowbrook, and continuing in the following days. Also vigorously chasing each other this day, with agonistic vocalizations.

10FE00. Chickadees singing (feebee song) at Willowbrook.

1AP00. Morton Arboretum, Heritage Trail. A mixed flock with at least 1 brown creeper, 2-3 chickadees; juncos and robin in area. Chickadees longer on each perch than golden-crowned kinglets observed yesterday. A lot of looking around, not so constantly moving between perches, and making larger jumps between perches, 3′ common. Later, another association of chickadees, golden-crowned kinglets and a white-breasted nuthatch. These mixed flocks stand out because after going through a long segment of forest path where there are essentially no birds, suddenly there are many at once of several species. Again, chickadees sitting longer in one place and moving farther between perches. All moving together in same direction through forest, and moved away from me as I observed them. Later still, a couple of chickadees without associates. Perhaps this is the kind of observation that led to the local core species idea.

25JE00. This spring I have observed 3 chickadee groups with parents and fledglings, one at the Arboretum on 1JE, one yesterday at Willowbrook, and a third in another part of the Arboretum today. Instead of being spread out, in each case the groups were clustered in a small area no more than 20 feet in diameter, and they moved only very slowly. Feedings were frequent, so apparently the parents directed or led their young to food-rich locations.

11MR01. A chickadee at Timber Ridge Forest Preserve with a variation on the fee-bee song: the “bee” syllable is repeated, and each syllable has the usual hinged quality, i.e., “fee-bee-ee-bee-ee.”

More recent observations have focused on the role of black-capped chickadees in mixed flocks.

29AU01. Algonquin Park, Ontario, Mizzy Lake Trail. Flock 1: Golden-crowned kinglets, a young-of-the-year black-throated green warbler, black-and-white warbler, black-capped chickadees. Flock 2: At an edge between mixed forest and a lake. Black-capped chickadees, several black-throated green warblers (appear to be sticking together to form their own group within the flock), at least 1 blue-headed vireo, 1 female or young blackburnian warbler, 1 chestnut-sided warbler, and 1 Tennessee warbler. The black-capped chickadees are very abundant here, the most apparently numerous birds in the forest (because of their frequent calling and frequent presence). It is easy to see how migrant birds accustomed to forming mixed flocks with them here in the north could attach to resident birds they encounter on the trip south. Flock 3: Black-capped chickadees, Swainson’s thrush.

30AU01. Algonquin Park, Bat Lake Trail. Flock 1: Black-capped chickadees, a black-and-white warbler, the latter singing. Flock 2: Black-capped chickadees, red-breasted nuthatches, golden-crowned kinglets, 1 or 2 black-throated blue warblers, at least 1 Tennessee warbler, yellow-rumped warbler. The first three species are the vocal ones. These flocks are distinctive: you go for hundreds of yards seeing or hearing no small birds, then suddenly there is one of these diverse groups in a small area.

31AU01. Algonquin Park, Spruce Bog Trail. Flock 1: Yellow-rumped warblers, black-capped chickadees, red-breasted nuthatches, golden-crowned kinglets. Do more northern birds, living in more open forests, either not have chickadees to associate with, or perhaps the scattered trees (if they are) remove the advantages of mixed flocks? See if it’s true that the non-mixed-flock species tend to be more northern.

12SE01. Willowbrook. Flock 1 around west end of cross trail. 2 chickadees and 1@ of black-throated green, magnolia, Tennessee (sang a couple times), and 1 unidentified species. Flock 2 near the NW corner of nature trail, a magnolia warbler apparently alone.

13SE01. Willowbrook. A large but difficult to view mixed flock near office building: 3 chickadees, 2 redstarts, a blackpoll warbler, a red-breasted nuthatch, and many others.

14SE01. Willowbrook. Flock 1 around NW corner of nature trail: redstart, chickadee, downy woodpecker, Tennessee warbler, black-throated green warbler, magnolia warbler, red-eyed vireo. Flock 2 between eastern part of animal exhibit and bridge. Chickadee, 3 redstarts, downy woodpecker, blackpoll warbler (it is possible that the one seen earlier joined this flock; it was near this location).

17SE01. Willowbrook. Flock 1: 3 chickadees, 1 redstart, others perhaps; near west end cross trail. Flock 2, base of savanna, 2 palm warblers only. Flock 3, brush area east of Nature Trail, 2 chickadees only. Flock 4, another part of same brush area, 2 chickadees, a magnolia warbler, 1 other unidentified.

19SE01. Willowbrook. Flock 1, east exhibit area to bridge: 2 chickadees, 1 black-throated blue warbler, 1 redstart, possibly others. Flock 2, west end cross trail: staying around berry-feeding robins, waxwings and catbird, with no chickadees around: a black-and-white warbler, 2 downy woodpeckers, a redstart, a blackpoll warbler, possibly others.

25SE01. Elsen’s Hill, plateau above river. Flock 1: at least 8 vocal, active yellow-rumped warblers, and a ruby-crowned kinglet. Flock 2, very large and diverse, only some individuals identified: 2 chickadees, black-throated green warbler, blackpoll warbler, 2 Nashville warblers (1 low in an aster thicket another in low tree branches), downy woodpeckers, a parula behaving like the Nashville, 2 redstarts, a chestnut-sided warbler.

26SE01. Willowbrook, between bridge and animal exhibit. 2 chickadees, and at least one @ of vireos (Philadelphia, red-eyed, yellow-throated), warblers (Tennessee, magnolia, parula, black-throated green), scarlet tanager, red-breasted nuthatch.

27SE01. Willowbrook. Flock between bridge and exhibit fence. 2 chickadees, 1 Tennessee and 1 magnolia warbler.

30SE01. Fox River and Island Park, Batavia. Many yellow-rumped warblers spread out all over, some hover-gleaning, some flycatching, others reaching for poison ivy berries. With them, a chickadee, a male Cape May warbler in the top of a silver maple, very active in the short time I saw it.

14SE02. Elsen’s Hill. I walked for several minutes, seeing apparently independent Tennessee warblers (2 together) and a Nashville warbler before encountering a large flock. This flock seemed to be changing composition over time, i.e., after my initial observations I walked a short distance away, then returned, and when I came back, some birds were the same but there were several new ones, as well. Later, after following the flock for 50 minutes or so and losing them in a direction I did not want to pursue in the brush, I returned to the starting point and a small mixed flock was there, with some of the birds I saw initially (apparently, none were marked of course) and a couple added ones. Initial group: a blackpoll warbler, 2 red-eyed vireos, 2 redstarts, an essentially silent chickadee, a black and white warbler, a Tennessee warbler, a Swainson’s thrush, a female or young black-throated blue warbler that was the only flock member calling consistently, all foraging in brush understory within 15 feet of the ground (the redstarts were the only ones consistently going above 10 feet; this was after 9 a.m.). Flock after my return: golden-winged warbler (like the redstarts, up higher, and very active, including flush and pursuit), a male and 2 female or young black-throated blue warblers, 2 Tennessee warblers, a black-throated green warbler, 3 redstarts, 2 blackpoll warblers, a black and white warbler, a blackburnian warbler. After it had warmed up some, later, a magnolia warbler foraging 20-25 feet up and the other birds also have gone higher. Doing a lot of reaching, and spending much time looking from each perch. At 10:45 I returned to the starting point: 4 noisier chickadees, 2 red-eyed vireos, a blackpoll warbler, a male redstart, a magnolia warbler, all except the chickadees foraging higher, throughout the tree canopies. Also a downy woodpecker, black-throated green warbler, Swainson’s thrush.

25AU08. Fullersburg Woods. First mixed flock of the fall migration has 2 chickadees, a downy woodpecker, a Tennessee warbler and a Canada warbler.

28AU08. Fullersburg Woods. Mixed flock just S of Willow Island bridge: 2 chickadees, 2 Tennessee warblers, 2 magnolia warblers, a gnatcatcher.

29AU08. Fullersburg Woods. Mixed flocks: One with four chickadees, two Tennessee warblers, a magnolia warbler and a black-and-white warbler. Also, 2 Tennessee warblers together apart from mixed flock. At mid-day a mixed flock near the junction of trails with 3 chickadees, 3 Tennessee warblers, a white-breasted nuthatch, a magnolia warbler, a parula. Chickadees were doing a lot of hanging upside down, Tennessees less acrobatic running along tops of branches and reaching, magnolia and parula more rapid movements, hopping between branches, nuthatch on bark, all in top half of canopy.

13SE08. Kettle Lakes Provincial Park, Ontario. Large, mixed flock in an area around 75 yards in diameter: at least 2 black-capped chickadees, 5 golden-crowned and 4 ruby-crowned kinglets, 4 yellow-rumped warblers, 2 red-eyed vireos, downy woodpecker, black-and-white warbler, black-throated green warbler, redstart, red-breasted nuthatch. I’m hearing white-throated sparrows, but they seem all near the ground rather than up in the trees with the others. Weak songs from ruby-crowneds, the black-throated green and the black-and-white. This is mainly an area of aspens with some jack pines. Mixed flock: at least 2 chickadees, at least 2 golden-crowned kinglets, 2 ruby-crowned, and a yellow-rump. Aspen grove again with some jack pines and a couple white pines.

15SE08. Nagagamisis Provincial Park. On trails, encountered a little flock of at least 7 ruby-crowned kinglets. Nothing up with them first time through, but white-throated sparrows lower down in that area (on the way back a chickadee, a brown creeper, 3 golden-crowned kinglets and a Swainson’s thrush added). Birds have been few, and I cannot discount the possibility of an association of the white-throated sparrows with this group. On the Time Trail, balsam fir the dominant tree with plenty of white spruces, some black spruces, white cedars, paper birches. Another mixed flock with at least one chickadee, 2 ruby-crowns, 3 golden-crowns.

21SE. Mayslake. A mixed flock at edge of Area 9 and grounds containing a black-throated blue warbler (new preserve species), black-throated green, 2 redstarts, 2 blackpolls, chestnut-sided, Nashville, black-and-white, magnolia, and a chickadee.

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