Recent Mayslake Arthropods

by Carl Strang

Recent walks at Mayslake Forest Preserve have resulted in some photos to share, all involving Lepidoptera. The wild bergamot have been on the decline, but still were producing enough flowers to attract the attention of pollinators.

A hummingbird clearwing bellies up to the bar.

A hummingbird clearwing bellies up to the bar.

Another flower proved to be a fatal attraction to a cabbage white butterfly, which I saw curiously dangling beneath it.

The yellow flower head of the sow thistle had been a good hiding place for a crab spider. It and its prey dangled from the spider’s safety line until the butterfly was subdued.

The yellow flower head of the sow thistle had been a good hiding place for a crab spider. It and its prey dangled from the spider’s safety line until the butterfly was subdued.

Enough of the spider was hidden that I could not narrow its identity beyond being in one of two genera.

Wings may be in the future for today’s final subject.

This black swallowtail is maturing on a diet of water hemlock, a plant that is quite poisonous to humans.

This black swallowtail is maturing on a diet of water hemlock, a plant that is quite poisonous to humans.

 

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Recent Butterflies

by Carl Strang

Earlier I mentioned that one winner in the winter survival sweepstakes appears to have been the spring azure. Another butterfly that apparently benefits from mild winters is the red admiral, and I have been seeing enough of these already at Mayslake Forest Preserve to regard them as another beneficiary in 2012.

Sometimes the red admiral can be seen at a flower or on territory, but often all you get is a flash of orange on an otherwise dark wing as the medium-sized butterfly flits past.

It’s too soon to tell with other butterflies. Last week I got the opportunity to photograph both genders of the wild indigo dusky wing, but they are the only two individuals I have seen to date.

The female of this species is somewhat brighter and lighter.

These skippers indeed often hang around Mayslake’s wild indigo plants, but their population reportedly has increased in recent decades as their larval diet has broadened to include other legumes.

The darker male wild indigo dusky wing is different enough that one easily could believe it belongs to a different species.

It seems I have been counting a few more black swallowtails than usual, as well, but again I need to see more before I will think they had greater than usual survivorship.

More Mayslake Lepidoptera (and others)

by Carl Strang

A couple days ago I updated the dragonflies and damselflies I have been finding at Mayslake Forest Preserve in my first year there. Today I’ll continue with newly sighted butterflies and a moth. These include black swallowtails, both female

black swallowtail female b

and male.

Black swallowtail male b

I have not seen larvae, but there are plenty of Queen Anne’s lace and other members of the family Umbelliferae that are potential food plants. When I saw the following hairstreak, I made sure to get photos.

Banded hairstreak b

This proves to be a banded hairstreak. A year ago I was alerted by Forest Preserve District invertebrate biologist Tom Velat to watch for southern or oak hairstreaks. That alert was prompted by the following photo I took of that species at Fullersburg, which I failed to identify correctly.

Southern (oak) hairstreak b

The hairstreaks require a close study of patterns in the lines of dots beneath both wings, and the arrangement of colors in the corner of the hindwing. I have one moth to share this time, the reversed haploa.

Haploa reversa Reversed haploa b

Haploa is a genus of tiger moths. I’ll close with three insects of milkweeds. The first is a familiar butterfly, the monarch, here visiting a purple coneflower in Mayslake’s Historic Garden.

Monarch Echinacea b

Monarch caterpillars feed on the leaves of milkweeds, in the process sequestering defensive poisons which then protect the specialist insect from its own consumers. Other insects have solved the milkweeds’ chemical challenge, and gone on to advertise their own poisonous status with bright colors. Two species in this category which recently have appeared at Mayslake are the red milkweed beetle

Red milkweed beetle b

and the large milkweed bug.

Large milkweed bug b

I’m sure I have barely scratched the surface of Mayslake’s Lepidoptera.

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