McHenry County Visit

by Carl Strang

On September 3 I drove up to McHenry County, Illinois, to continue my regional survey of singing insects. I spent most of that hot afternoon at the Pleasant Valley Conservation Area.

This county park has some very good woodlands and savannas.

This county park has some very good woodlands and savannas.

The day produced 7 county records.

My first four-spotted tree cricket in McHenry was at Pleasant Valley.

My first four-spotted tree cricket in McHenry was at Pleasant Valley.

A shift to the Hickory Grove Conservation Area produced additional observations, some of them remarkable.

The most unexpected find was a small group of gladiator meadow katydids, still singing weeks after they normally are done.

The most unexpected find was a small group of gladiator meadow katydids, still singing weeks after they normally are done.

The photo shows the characteristic pronotum profile and cerci. The marsh habitat and the distinctive song pattern, with the ticks finishing, rather than preceding, the buzz portion of the song all were consistent with gladiator meadow katydid. The black spots on the abdomen may be signs of a parasite load; could that have delayed the completion of development?

The same site produced this marsh meadow grasshopper.

The same site produced this marsh meadow grasshopper.

The Lyons Prairie and Marsh, administered as part of Hickory Grove by the McHenry County Conservation District, actually is in Lake County. I followed the trail into a portion of the marsh dominated by reed canary grass. In addition to abundant slender and short-winged meadow katydids, I got an intriguing glimpse at a female Orchelimum that might have been a dusky-faced meadow katydid, which I have yet to find in Illinois. I was unsuccessful in getting a better look in that late afternoon, but at some point I need to get back there for a thorough search.

On the way back to the car I spotted this tiny grasshopper. Mature at around 3/8 inch long, it is a non-singing species, the black-sided pygmy grasshopper.

On the way back to the car I spotted this tiny grasshopper. Mature at around 3/8 inch long, it is a non-singing species, the black-sided pygmy grasshopper.

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McHenry County Exploration

by Carl Strang

On Friday I took a vacation day to check out some sites in McHenry County for their singing insect potential. I saw parts of 4 widely scattered Conservation Areas (their equivalent of Forest Preserves), and picked up 4 county records for my study along the way.

Within minutes of arriving at the first site, Elizabeth Lake, I spotted this bush katydid feeding on a tansy flower head.

Within minutes of arriving at the first site, Elizabeth Lake, I spotted this bush katydid feeding on a tansy flower head.

The small body size, and the shape of the ovipositor, identified this female as a fork-tailed bush katydid.

The small body size, and the shape of the ovipositor, identified this female as a fork-tailed bush katydid.

That was not one of the county records, but I did pick up two at that site: Forbes’s tree cricket, and slender meadow katydid.

The area with the greatest potential proved to be Hickory Grove-Lyons. These areas are a political oddity. Though the Lyons portion is in Lake County, it is cut off by a bend of the Fox River, and so managed by the McHenry County Conservation District.

A boardwalk leads through a high quality marsh at Hickory Grove. Other marshes and woodlands in this, and the adjacent Lyons area, are priorities for future exploration.

A boardwalk leads through a high quality marsh at Hickory Grove. Other marshes and woodlands in this, and the adjacent Lyons area, are priorities for future exploration.

The year’s first Texas bush katydids, which also provided a county record, were singing in that marsh. The fourth county record, common true katydid (which seems oddly uncommon in McHenry), came at a good-looking forested preserve, Coral Woods. I look forward to return visits to some of these sites.

 

Seeking the Lyric Cicada

by Carl Strang

Last Thursday I searched for the northernmost lyric cicadas, having found them superabundant in Kendall County and absent in the portions of McHenry County I surveyed. This is a woodland species that seems especially common in bottomland forests, so I took advantage of our glacial legacy and followed rivers north and south (rivers developed in low zones between the concentric end moraines), but also stopped at other woodlands along the way.

Lyric cicada, Tibicen lyricen

Lyric cicada, Tibicen lyricen

There clearly is a gradient in density from south to north. In Kendall County, and along the Des Plaines River at the south edge of DuPage County, large numbers of lyric cicadas form loud choruses. In central DuPage County, at locations such as Fullersburg Woods and Mayslake, this is a regular part of the insect fauna, but they are down to countable numbers of individuals.

The clearest indication came as I followed the West Branch of the DuPage River, and continued north beyond it.  At Blackwell Forest Preserve, in west central DuPage County, there was a ratio of 11 lyric cicadas to 18 or so Linne’s cicadas (= 0.61; Linne’s has a fairly uniform density through the area). At Elsen’s Hill, a few miles farther north, the ratio was 4:7 (0.57).  Several miles farther north, at West Branch Forest Preserve, the ratio was 3:7 (0.43). The farthest north I found this species was at Shoe Factory Woods, in north Cook County, where the ratio was 2:12 (0.17).

Shoe Factory Woods has some good prairie and savanna restorations going.

Shoe Factory Woods has some good prairie and savanna restorations going.

By that point, though, cicadas had entered their afternoon lull, and I wasn’t hearing many of any species. Shifting west and driving south along the Fox River, I heard the next lyric cicada at the north edge of St. Charles, a point close in latitude to West Branch Forest Preserve. For now I have a sense of what is happening in the northern edge of this species’ range, but I will continue to monitor them for changes, and to continue seeking that northernmost population in the region.

McHenry County Singing Insects

by Carl Strang

On Saturday I traveled north to McHenry County, Illinois, to continue my regional survey of singing insects. That county is blessed with some impressive sites, and I was able to cover only parts of two of them. Moraine Hills State Park has a wide range of representative habitats covering large acreages.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Much of the park is spanned by a network of bike paths, and my next survey trip there will involve my bike. I also paid a visit to a McHenry County Conservation District property, Glacial Park.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

There are savannas, restored prairie, and wetlands of varied quality.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The species count for McHenry County totaled 16, the list mainly overlapping that for Kendall County from the previous day. The differences were interesting, though. Where the day at Kendall was dominated by omnipresent choruses of lyric cicadas, I did not hear a single member of that species in McHenry. At some point I will follow a couple rivers north and south to find the current range limit for that species, which is common in DuPage County not far south of McHenry.

The McHenry woodlands had rattler round-wing katydids, which I did not find in Kendall County, but the latter had Nebraska coneheads which I did not find in McHenry County. I need to find a drier, more open woodland in Kendall County, but the Nebraska conehead likely is a species which, like the lyric cicada, has its northern range limit somewhere between those two counties.

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