Closing the Book on Sulfur-wings

by Carl Strang

The sulfur-winged grasshopper is an early season species that I wanted to close out this year, in my regional survey of singing insects. Though it probably occurs in all 22 of the counties in my survey region, it is common only on soils heavy in gravel or sand. I targeted 3 counties with such soils where I had not yet found this crepitating (wing-rattling) grasshopper: Walworth in Wisconsin, LaPorte in Indiana, and Berrien in Michigan.

Success came first at the Lulu Lake natural area in Walworth County. I did not find it in the Nature Conservancy portion of the property, but gravel-hill openings in the forest on the state nature preserve side proved to have a good population.

One of the series of photos documenting sulfur-winged grasshoppers at Lulu Lake.

Subsequently I found them in the Lake Michigan coastal zone in LaPorte and Berrien Counties. In the process I learned a final lesson from the grasshoppers: they don’t like loose dune sand, and need to be sought a little farther inland, where plants and the accumulation of organic matter have made the soil more stable. That closes the book on sulfur-winged grasshoppers as far as my survey is concerned, and I will put my time into other species at this point of the season in future years.

The updated Chicago region sulfur-winged grasshopper map, marking counties where I have found it.

 

Photos May-July

by Carl Strang

It’s been a busy field season, and I have fallen way behind in blog posts. I’ll catch up eventually, but today will share a smorgasbord of photos from May through July.

This barred owl appeared during a walk through St. James Farm Forest Preserve. I believe I had come close to its nest tree.

This barred owl appeared during a walk through St. James Farm Forest Preserve. I believe I had come close to its nest tree.

Here is the first slender spreadwing I have found at St. James Farm.

Here is the first slender spreadwing I have found at St. James Farm.

Wild yam graces the understory of the St. James Farm forest.

Wild yam graces the understory of the St. James Farm forest.

Sporangia on the underside of a lady fern leaf at St. James Farm.

Sporangia on the underside of a lady fern leaf at St. James Farm.

The Lulu Lake Nature Preserve in Walworth County, Wisconsin, has become a favorite site. Here a woodland graces a kame.

The Lulu Lake Nature Preserve in Walworth County, Wisconsin, has become a favorite site. Here a woodland graces a kame.

An eight-spotted forester provided a photo op in the nature preserve portion of the Round Lake state property in Starke County, Indiana.

An eight-spotted forester provided a photo op in the nature preserve portion of the Round Lake state property in Starke County, Indiana.

This dragonfly I encountered at Houghton Lake in Marshall County, Indiana, was a bit of a puzzler. I eventually concluded it was a somewhat odd widow skimmer.

This dragonfly I encountered at Houghton Lake in Marshall County, Indiana, was a bit of a puzzler. I eventually concluded it was a somewhat odd widow skimmer, but later changed the ID to slaty skimmer (see comments).

 

Lulu Lake

by Carl Strang

During a 3-day Wisconsin trip last week, I made a lot of stops in Racine, Walworth and Kenosha Counties, the most remarkable of which was a state natural area, Lulu Lake, in Walworth County.

The site includes a large, high quality bog.

The site includes a large, high quality bog.

For once, the songs of the sphagnum ground crickets were not buried among those of Say’s trigs, as has been true at other bogs I have visited.

The bog is surrounded by hills of glacial outwash gravel.

The bog is surrounded by hills of glacial outwash gravel.

Those hills held two species I have not observed elsewhere in Walworth County to date: tinkling and spotted ground crickets. The former seem to prefer dry woodland edges on well drained sandy soils. The latter like moist shaded spots in woods on well drained sandy soils.

The bog is reached from the south by a long walk through a meadow with a good percentage of prairie plants. This curve-tailed bush katydid was a resident of that meadow.

The bog is reached from the south by a long walk through a meadow with a good percentage of prairie plants. This curve-tailed bush katydid was a resident of that meadow.

One more photo from the Wisconsin trip comes from an Interstate rest stop, also in Walworth, where I found my first straight-lanced meadow katydids for that county.

Nancy Collins had remarked that the straight-lanced males on her site had brown cerci. Going back, I find that this is true of every male I have photographed over the years.

Nancy Collins had remarked that the straight-lanced males on her site had brown cerci. Going back, I find that this is true of every male I have photographed over the years.

This was a very productive trip, resulting in 22 county records for the three days.

 

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