Assorted Photos 2

by Carl Strang

Today I’ll share photos of some colorful insects. Fiery skippers are described in references as a southern species that sometimes appears in the North. It seems to me, though, that a year seldom goes by when I fail to see them.

I have seen fiery skippers several times at Mayslake Forest Preserve this year. This one’s on sneezeweed.

With summer waning away, it’s appropriate to begin seeing autumn meadowhawks.

AKA yellow-legged meadowhawks, for obvious reasons.

Finally I want to focus on some very small insects. They are tiny, but so abundant this year that it’s been impossible to overlook them. The shiny black beetles, each at most a couple millimeters long, first showed up in sweep nets the kids were swinging at the Forest Preserve District’s employee parent-child event at Mayslake in August. Then they were mainly in Queen Anne’s lace flowers. Lately they have shifted to goldenrods.

They plunge their heads into the little florets of this Canada goldenrod.

Their simple hump-backed oval shape, shiny elytra, and abundance all made it seem likely they should be common enough to find in references. I tried probing them, and they showed no jumping talent, so I ruled out flea beetles. I found a likely match while scanning photos representing the various families of beetles in the BugGuide website. They appear to be members of the shining flower beetle family, Phalacridae. One common genus is Olibrus.

Here They Are!

by Carl Strang

In a recent post I mentioned that I have not seen many meadowhawks at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Two days ago I finally found a bunch there, around the edge of the stream corridor marsh. I saw several white-faced meadowhawks.

There also were a number of autumn meadowhawks.

These latter males were, I suspect, hanging around waiting for a heavy rainstorm. On several occasions I have seen pairs of this species laying their eggs on days after late season rains, the females depositing their prospective offspring on the mud just above the waterline, instinctively trusting that spring downpours will raise the pond level enough to submerge the eggs and stimulate hatching.

That same day, up near the friary demolition site I saw a late-flying shadow darner.

And, as a non-odonate bonus, near the off-leash dog fence I spotted a persisting female fiery skipper.

I treasure these last colorful insects. Soon we enter the long season of quiet.

August Insect Phenology

by Carl Strang

I was able to accumulate first-of-the-year sightings for 11 insect species at Mayslake Forest Preserve in August that could be compared to last year’s dates. These ranged from 44 days earlier to 77 days later, with a median of 11 days earlier. The extremes in range are greater than I see in plants, and usually reflect either different generations of insects within a season (I missed spotting representatives of an earlier or later generation in one year or the other), or uncommon species.

I also added 13 new species to the preserve’s list. Some of these I have mentioned in earlier posts (straight-lanced meadow katydid, citrine forktail, and fork-tailed bush katydid). Others were the black blister beetle,

meadow fritillary,

common buckeye,

ailanthus webworm,

fiery skipper,

and green cloverworm moth.

The fiery skipper is a southern species that moves north in considerable numbers in some years. The green cloverworm moth is distinctive enough that the blurry photo is sufficient to identify it, a common species whose presence is expected. The remaining new species were eastern tailed-blue, common true katydid, jumping bush cricket, and swamp cicada. As mentioned in an earlier post, I have been alert for the presence of the swamp cicada in DuPage County, and was pleased to hear single individuals singing on three different days at Mayslake in August.

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