Shaking Out the Photo Bag

by Carl Strang

Before I get going on a new series of posts, I want to share a few photos that didn’t fit into last year’s topics.

This seemed to be a good year for gray treefrogs across the region. I frequently ran into small ones.

Gray treefrogs can change colors, making themselves green to blend in.

For some reason, they often rested on milkweed leaves.

It was a good year of singing insect field work. Plenty of questions remain unanswered.

One of the smaller ones was the identity of this grasshopper nymph at the Indiana Kankakee Sands. My best guess is sprinkled grasshopper, which I found there in adult form later in the season.

An interesting observation in the Tefft Savanna Nature Preserve (within Indiana’s Jasper-Pulaski Fish & Wildlife Area) was that short-winged green grasshoppers (Dichromorpha viridis) were the usual green color in wetlands but were brown in the savannas.

A mating pair of brown variants.

Late in the season I visited my friends Lisa Rainsong and Wendy Partridge, who live in the Cleveland suburbs. One goal was to see jumping bush crickets out in the foliage and branches of trees and shrubs. In the Chicago region they almost always stick to the trunks of trees and are difficult to see.

Sure enough, within a few minutes of searching I found a singing male in a bush.

They have an odd angular appearance, as though roughly carved from wood.

That’s it for now. Soon I will share results of a productive winter project.

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Bendix Woods Bioblitz

by Carl Strang

It’s been an unusually busy September, and there has been no time for writing in recent days. Much of that time has been occupied by field work, however, so I have a backlog of observations to share through a number of posts. Last weekend there was a bioblitz at Bendix Woods, a St. Joseph County Park in Indiana. Many of the scientists who participated in this species count could do it as a day trip. A few of us camped overnight. It was well worth it, and three posts will be needed to tell the full story.

I was there for singing insects, of course, and so needed to do survey work after dark as well as during the day. The nighttime drive along the park’s roads revealed a healthy population of oblong-winged katydids.

This one took a break from singing to seek out a new perch, his long legs moving slowly in the cooling night air.

This one took a break from singing to seek out a new perch, his long legs moving slowly in the cooling night air.

While trying to locate the katydid I ran across a couple other members of the Bendix fauna.

Gray treefrogs are abundant at Bendix Woods. I saw at least 8 individuals during the 24-hour event.

Gray treefrogs are abundant at Bendix Woods. I saw at least 8 individuals during the 24-hour event.

This female walking stick, Diapheromera femorata, was nearly 4 inches long.

This female walking stick, Diapheromera femorata, was nearly 4 inches long.

Lights set up by a Field Museum of Natural History team drew in a variety of moths, caddis flies and others.

This was a crane fly that got hung up on a support rope, not a hangingfly, as some of us hoped at first glance. The hangingflies are a group of scorpion flies.

This was a crane fly that got hung up on a support rope, not a hangingfly, as some of us hoped at first glance. The hangingflies are a group of scorpion flies.

 

This pine tree spur-throated grasshopper came to the light, and I saved it to photograph the next day. The species proved to be common in the groves of white pines which have been planted in the park to spell out “STUDEBAKER” in very large block letters that can be read only from the sky.

This pine tree spur-throated grasshopper came to the light, and I saved it to photograph the next day. The species proved to be common in the groves of white pines which have been planted in the park to spell out “STUDEBAKER” in very large block letters that can be read only from the sky.

 

I’ll close out with another, more widespread species, the differential grasshopper.

I’ll close out with another, more widespread species, the differential grasshopper.

There were two singing insect species that I met for the first time at Bendix Woods, and each will get a post of its own.

Sights Along the Way

by Carl Strang

It has been a memorable few weeks. This year I took the bulk of my vacation time in the heart of the singing insect season, mid-August to mid-September, and spent most of it traveling around the 22-county area, from southwest Michigan to southeast Wisconsin, where I am seeking the 100 species of cicadas, crickets, katydids and singing grasshoppers that occur (at least potentially) there. This travel took me to many memorable places.

High quality forests are scattered around the region. Sanders Park, Racine County, Wisconsin.

High quality forests are scattered around the region. Sanders Park, Racine County, Wisconsin.

I didn’t spend a lot of time in the forests, however, much as I love them. Most singing insects live in more open habitats.

The dunes around the edge of Lake Michigan provided some of the most open habitats. Warren Dunes State Park, Michigan.

The dunes around the edge of Lake Michigan provided some of the most open habitats. Warren Dunes State Park, Michigan.

One of my favorite areas was Miller Woods at the western end of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.

The trail leads through savanna and past wetlands. Here it crosses a former rail foundation.

The trail leads through savanna and past wetlands. Here it crosses a former rail foundation.

The Miller Woods Trail eventually skirts a large pond at the edge of the dunes, and reaches the beach.

The Miller Woods Trail eventually skirts a large pond at the edge of the dunes, and reaches the beach.

Wetlands included Bluff Creek in the Kettle Moraine State Forest, Walworth County, Wisconsin.

The water was beautiful and clear, flowing over stones and gravel.

The water was beautiful and clear, flowing over stones and gravel.

A fen-like wetland, bordering the creek, contained species such as the fringed gentian.

A fen-like wetland, bordering the creek, contained species such as the fringed gentian.

Sure, I was paying attention to species other than singing insects. At the Houghton Lake Nature Conservancy property in Marshall County, Indiana, I encountered a couple interesting ones.

A Chinese mantis nymph stalked through the wetland vegetation.

A Chinese mantis nymph stalked through the wetland vegetation.

This gray treefrog snoozed in a leaf bed.

This gray treefrog snoozed in a leaf bed.

The most extensive prairie I encountered was in the Bong Recreation Area, Kenosha County, Wisconsin.

Its size alone speaks to the potential in this restoration project.

Its size alone speaks to the potential in this restoration project.

For now I will close with the sunset on my last evening at Bong.

The sunset was a beautiful prelude to a rainy evening in camp.

The sunset was a beautiful prelude to a rainy evening in camp.

The singing insects of course were the focus of all this travel. I’ll share images of some of them in future posts.

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