Mayslake Bugs

by Carl Strang

The warming weather has produced the first wave of insects at Mayslake Forest Preserve. These early-season adults overwintered in that form or in the stage just prior, or in some cases, migrated from the South.

The Carolina saddlebags is one such likely migrant.

The Carolina saddlebags is one such likely migrant.

This individual gave me a rare opportunity to photograph it in such a way as to show off its diagnostic purple forehead. The slender legs have the strength to hold the dragonfly to its perch.

Though I think of the eastern tailed-blue as a late-summer butterfly, that is the second generation of the year. Here is one of the early-season firsters.

Though I think of the eastern tailed-blue as a late-summer butterfly, that is the second generation of the year. Here is one of the early-season firsters.

Wild indigo dusky wings frequently may be encountered at Mayslake early in the season.

Wild indigo dusky wings frequently may be encountered at Mayslake early in the season.

The preserve harbors two host plants for the caterpillars: white wild indigo, a desired native prairie species, and the unwanted crown vetch, an introduced invasive.

Playing Catch-Up 3

by Carl Strang

The remaining photos in the hopper are of Lepidoptera, mainly moths, but we’ll begin with a butterfly.

Wild indigo dusky wings usually don’t wander far from their food plants at Mayslake Forest Preserve, which has both white wild indigo and, until the restoration team succeeds in eradicating it, crown vetch.

Wild indigo dusky wings usually don’t wander far from their food plants at Mayslake Forest Preserve, which has both white wild indigo and, until the restoration team succeeds in eradicating it, crown vetch.

Now for two views of different individuals of a geometrid moth called the confused eusarca.

This is a common color pattern in geometrids. One important distinguishing detail for this species is that the long line does not reach the wingtip.

This is a common color pattern in geometrids. One important distinguishing detail for this species is that the long line does not reach the wingtip.

This oblique angle provides additional detail, as well as offering an opportunity to see some individual variation.

This oblique angle provides additional detail, as well as offering an opportunity to see some individual variation.

The forage looper is a very common moth in our area.

The forage looper is a very common moth in our area.

This white-spotted sable was not interested in giving me a dorsal angle, so I settled for an oblique ventral one.

This white-spotted sable was not interested in giving me a dorsal angle, so I settled for an oblique ventral one.

More Weeds

by Carl Strang

Time to catch up on the weeds at Mayslake, as many more have begun to bloom. Remember that here I am using a very broad definition for “weed,” that includes the meanings of undesirable plant, plant not native to the area, and plant with a weedy life history strategy . An example of a native plant in the last category is annual bedstraw.

Annual bedstraw b

The rest of today’s species are imports. Two are from Asia, and perhaps it is no coincidence that these two both had specific agricultural uses. One is alfalfa.

Alfalfa b

The only place I have seen alfalfa at Mayslake so far is in a location that once held a dairy farm, and I wonder if this plant’s history traces to that operation. The other Asian weed also very much meets the definition of “undesirable plant.”

Multiflora rose b

Multiflora rose was widely planted as a thorny hedge, decades ago. Too late people realized how uncontainable this shrub is, and I have gotten many a piercing while trying to remove it from places under my protection. The rest of today’s weed list comes from Europe, and most probably were hitchhikers. One exception is red clover.

Red clover b

Another, European highbush cranberry, is planted widely as a landscape shrub.

European highbush cranberry 2b

Crown vetch has been planted in an effort to control erosion and enrich the soil cheaply in highway construction projects.

Crown vetch 1b

Like multiflora rose, it has become a problem plant because it won’t stay put. As far as I know, the remaining European species were incidental rather than intentional imports. These include ox-eye daisy,

Ox-eye daisy b

sulfur cinquefoil,

Sulfur cinquefoil b

bittersweet nightshade,

Bittersweet nightshade b

English plantain,

English plantain b

and yellow sweet clover.

Yellow sweet clover b

So far I have not seen white sweet clover at Mayslake.

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