Early Odonata

by Carl Strang

We’re barely into June, and already there has been some remarkable dragonfly and damselfly action at Mayslake Forest Preserve. In a previous post I showed early reproductive activity by common spreadwings. Two more spreadwing species appeared before the end of May: slender spreadwing, which I had found on the preserve before, and a new one, the swamp spreadwing.

Many individuals of all three species have emerged from the stream corridor marsh.

Back on May 4 I saw this four-spotted skimmer.

I’m pretty sure I have never seen one so early in the season. I’ll finish with a UFO shot (unidentified flying Odonata). On May 26 I saw two tandem pairs and a single, all saddlebags of one of the red-bodied species, over the stream corridor marsh. One of the pairs I saw laying eggs. They were staying too far out for me to see clearly, so I resorted to the UFO technique.

I am leaning toward Carolina saddlebags rather than red saddlebags. The insects’ bodies were bright red rather than dull red, it still is fairly early in the season when Carolinas are more common, and there appears to be a lot of black on the abdomen tip in the photo. There was no chance of seeing the definitive forehead color, however, so I’m not willing to call the identification certain.

Early Insects

by Carl Strang

This spring, plants have been flowering a couple weeks ahead of last year, and some of the insects are making early appearances as well. This spring azure butterfly was out by April 12 at Mayslake Forest Preserve.

The earliest dragonfly of the year always is the migratory common green darner, the first of which showed up on April 5. That’s one of my earliest observation dates for the species. Last week I found a few other odonates at the stream corridor marsh, including this pair of common spreadwings in wheel position.

There also were both eastern and fragile forktails, the latter a new preserve record. Another new insect for the Mayslake list was this skipper, which I believe is a Juvenal’s duskywing.

A colony of eastern tent caterpillars is well under way north of the off-leash dog area.

To the right of the nest you can see the egg mass from which the caterpillars emerged.

Though flowers are blooming earlier, pollinators have not been caught napping. Here a carpenter bee visits cut-leaved toothwort flowers.

At first I thought it might be a Bombus impatiens worker, but the queens of that bumblebee species still seem to be searching for nest sites. At most they are beginning to tend their first set of larvae. The lack of yellow on the relatively hairless abdomen of this individual rules out all bumblebees.

Finally, I can declare the singing insect season to be open. The first greenstriped grasshoppers were displaying at Mayslake on April 20. In my 5 years’ experience with singing insects this is the earliest crepitation I have heard from that species, by 8 days.

Mayslake Odonata Update

by Carl Strang

The weather has been rainy, gloomy and cool on many recent days, but when the sun appeared so did the insects. At Mayslake Forest Preserve I have been able to add new species and observations that provide a foundation for future study. Eastern forktail damselflies already have been busy laying eggs in May’s Lake.

Eastern forktails laying eggs b

Meanwhile, other damselflies are emerging. The next two photos are, I believe, of common spreadwings, a male

Common spreadwing b

and a female.

Common spreadwing female 3b

Having newly emerged, they are holding their wings together more than usual. Another spreadwing species is the slender spreadwing.

Slender spreadwing 1b

Note the contrasting pale veins of the wingtips. Another, blurry photo established that the abdomen has the characteristic length, twice that of the wings. I have seen orange bluets at both of the preserve’s lakes.

Orange bluet b

Familiar bluets also have begun to appear.

Familiar bluet b

The year’s first blue-fronted dancer was a female.

Blue-fronted dancer female b

Its abdomen is dark, including the sides of the tip, and has only a very narrow pale line down the top. Shifting now to dragonflies, I’ll start with a 12-spotted skimmer that began patrolling the stream corridor marsh in June. I expect the species to be common there. This one I photographed elsewhere in 2004.

12-spotted skimmer b

Blue dashers have been active out in the fields, and soon will be appearing at lakes and marshes.

Blue dasher female 1b

A jade clubtail has staked out a piece of the May’s Lake shore.

Jade clubtail b

Cruising farther out are the prince baskettails. Here is a UFO-ish shot of one.

Prince baskettail UFO b

And here is a common baskettail  showing the basal wingspots that are visible on some, but not all individuals.

Common baskettail spot b

A final, cautionary photo:

Eastern forktail new female b

This is not an orange bluet, but a newly emerged female eastern forktail. Note the absence of the orange at the abdomen tip plus the expanded orange area at the base of the abdomen.

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