2019 Bioblitz

by Carl A. Strang

Each year the Indiana Academy of Science co-hosts a bioblitz somewhere in that state. This year’s site was The Center at Donaldson, which includes a retreat center and Ancilla College, plus surrounding properties. I always take the singing insects in this annual 24-hour count of species, but no one came to cover Lepidoptera or Odonata in 2019, so I appended them to my commitment. That is just as well, because these events are scheduled early enough in the season that few singing insects have reached the adult stage.

Some Roesel’s katydids matured in time for the bioblitz.

Two of the five singing insect species I found were common early species that were nearly finished, two were common mid-season species recently coming into song, and one of them provided an observation of significance. The eastern striped cricket is thinly scattered in northwest Indiana, possibly expanding into that region from the south or west. A single male singing in the evening provided a Marshall County record, a full county’s width farther east than I have observed them before.

I enjoyed re-acquainting myself with the beauty of dragonflies, damselflies, butterflies and moths, and photographed many of them.

The widow skimmer was the most abundant dragonfly.

Most of the eastern or common pondhawks still were green. Males will change to blue over time.

The Halloween pennant pleases the eye.

There weren’t many damselflies. Here, a blue-fronted dancer.

Newly emerged eastern forktail females are orange.

A few monarchs graced the grounds.

There were many great spangled fritillaries, plus this meadow fritillary.

I encountered a few moths during the day, but most came to my ultraviolet light setup in the forest, or the Purdue team’s assorted bright lights in the open. Moths are underappreciated for their beauty, diversity, and ecological significance.

Large lace-border, Scopula limboundata

Reversed haploa, Haploa reversa

Painted lichen moth, Hypoprepia fucosa

Delicate cycnia, Cycnia tenera

Isabella tiger moth, Pyrrharctia Isabella

Imperial moth, Eacles imperialis

Hermit sphinx, Lintneria eremitus

Snowy-shouldered acleris, Acleris nivisellana

Oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana

Grape leaffolder, Desmia funeralis

Grape plume moth, Geina periscelidactylus

Large maple spanworm, Prochoerodes lineola

Lesser maple spanworm, Macaria pustularia

Small engrailed, Ectropis crepuscularia

Ovate dagger, Acronicta ovata

Pink-barred pseudostrotia, Pseudostrotia carneola

The Hebrew, Polygrammate hebraeicum

The brother, Raphia frater

Along the way I encountered a few other species to add to the species count.

Narrow-winged grasshoppers were common on the bioblitz base camp’s sandy hill.

A Pennsylvania wood cockroach came to the UV light.

The light also drew this striking summer fishfly.

 

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Playing Catch-Up 2

by Carl Strang

Odonata continue to show well at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Today’s photo gallery features some recent sightings.

This male spreadwing clearly was not a slender spreadwing, which species has dominated the spreadwing damselfly fauna at the preserve this year. I generally photograph these from the side and above, as I haven’t yet internalized their distinguishing features.

This male spreadwing clearly was not a slender spreadwing, which species has dominated the spreadwing damselfly fauna at the preserve this year. I generally photograph these from the side and above, as I haven’t yet internalized their distinguishing features.

The abdomen tip tells the tale, both with the triangular black intrusion in segment 8, and in the shape of the terminal appendages, which demonstrate why this species has been named the lyre-tipped spreadwing.

The abdomen tip tells the tale, both with the triangular black intrusion in segment 8, and in the shape of the terminal appendages, which demonstrate why this species has been named the lyre-tipped spreadwing.

This is only the second or third time I have encountered that species at Mayslake. A dragonfly which likewise has made few appearances is the Halloween pennant.

This teneral individual was perched near Mays’ Lake, from which it probably emerged.

This teneral individual was perched near Mays’ Lake, from which it probably emerged.

The following dragonflies are regulars, but no less beautiful for that.

Common green darner

Common green darner

Jade clubtails have been resting on algal mats in the lakes.

Jade clubtails have been resting on algal mats in the lakes.

One of the fiercest dragonflies for its size, a common pondhawk.

One of the fiercest dragonflies for its size, a common pondhawk.

Common whitetails are easy photographic targets, as they often rest on the ground.

Common whitetails are easy photographic targets, as they often rest on the ground.

Dragonfly Notes

by Carl Strang

Today I want to share some observations of dragonflies from last week. It was, as you know, stinking hot all week, reaching 100F on Thursday and Friday. In the late morning on Friday, with the temperature in the mid-90’s, I was taking an early lunchtime walk along the May’s Lake shore. I noticed that the black saddlebags all were flying in an unusual position.

All had this peculiar abdomen dip, which they held as they flew.

It was reminiscent of the obelisk posture, shown by a perched dragonfly pointing its abdomen up at the sun. This is thought to reduce overheating in the insect’s body. I wonder if the saddlebags, in that extreme heat, likewise were reducing the size of their abdomens’ exposure profile. They were among the largest dragonflies I saw that day, which further might increase their danger of overheating.

Earlier in the week I was walking through one of Mayslake Forest Preserve’s prairies when I saw a common pondhawk carrying a relatively large prey to a perch.

It had caught a smaller dragonfly, a female eastern amberwing.

Female and immature male pondhawks have such perfect grass-green camouflage that they are practically invisible when perched in prairies and meadows. They are sit-and-wait predators, zooming out to catch passing insects. This predation on another dragonfly is not so rare. I once saw one catch a calico pennant, a dragonfly larger than the amberwing.

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