Early Season Survey: Berrien County

by Carl Strang

I took last week as a vacation to do some early season singing insect surveying across the Chicago region. Monday took me to Berrien County, Michigan, which I had searched only once before late in the season. In addition to seeking the few species active this early, I wanted to scout some sites for their later-season potential. My first stop was Galien River County Park.

The start of the trail looked promising. The forest proved to be of good quality. I listened for northern wood crickets, but none were there.

The start of the trail looked promising. The forest proved to be of good quality. I listened for northern wood crickets, but none were there.

The park’s most spectacular feature is a wonderful canopy walkway, which ends in a platform overlooking the Galien River and moderate quality wetlands.

The park’s most spectacular feature is a wonderful canopy walkway, which ends in a platform overlooking the Galien River and moderate quality wetlands.

The walkway takes you into the upper canopy. I’m looking forward to getting back some evening later in the season.

The walkway takes you into the upper canopy. I’m looking forward to getting back some evening later in the season.

The marsh is cattail dominated, with reed canary grass invading, but has some potential for wetlands singing insects.

The marsh is cattail dominated, with reed canary grass invading, but has some potential for wetlands singing insects.

Another site new to my experience was Mud Lake Bog. Bogs are few in the region, so I had high hopes.

I was not disappointed. A boardwalk winds a good length through a high quality bog.

I was not disappointed. A boardwalk winds a good length through a high quality bog.

There was plenty of sphagnum moss, so I expect to add Berrien to the short list of counties in the region still harboring sphagnum ground crickets.

There was plenty of sphagnum moss, so I expect to add Berrien to the short list of counties in the region still harboring sphagnum ground crickets.

A final stop for the day was Warren Dunes State Park. Spring field crickets were common in the more sheltered spots of the outer dunes.

A final stop for the day was Warren Dunes State Park. Spring field crickets were common in the more sheltered spots of the outer dunes.

An early season delight is to spot the glowing yellow of hairy puccoons.

An early season delight is to spot the glowing yellow of hairy puccoons.

No need to enhance the color in a photo of these beauties.

No need to enhance the color in a photo of these beauties.

Though the day produced only 2 county species records, it was delightful for visits to familiar sites and the promise of the new ones.

 

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McHenry County Singing Insects

by Carl Strang

On Saturday I traveled north to McHenry County, Illinois, to continue my regional survey of singing insects. That county is blessed with some impressive sites, and I was able to cover only parts of two of them. Moraine Hills State Park has a wide range of representative habitats covering large acreages.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Much of the park is spanned by a network of bike paths, and my next survey trip there will involve my bike. I also paid a visit to a McHenry County Conservation District property, Glacial Park.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

There are savannas, restored prairie, and wetlands of varied quality.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The species count for McHenry County totaled 16, the list mainly overlapping that for Kendall County from the previous day. The differences were interesting, though. Where the day at Kendall was dominated by omnipresent choruses of lyric cicadas, I did not hear a single member of that species in McHenry. At some point I will follow a couple rivers north and south to find the current range limit for that species, which is common in DuPage County not far south of McHenry.

The McHenry woodlands had rattler round-wing katydids, which I did not find in Kendall County, but the latter had Nebraska coneheads which I did not find in McHenry County. I need to find a drier, more open woodland in Kendall County, but the Nebraska conehead likely is a species which, like the lyric cicada, has its northern range limit somewhere between those two counties.

National Lakeshore Wetlands

by Carl Strang

After catching the melodious ground cricket I drove to Pinhook Bog, a part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore that is open to the public only on rare occasions. I hoped to find stripe-faced meadow katydids, but the bog’s public access boardwalk was bordered by little in the way of grasses and sedges. I was gratified, however, by the presence of sphagnum ground crickets.

These were the first I have found in Indiana. I have seen them only at Volo Bog in Illinois.

After lunch I returned to the place where Gideon, Nathan and I caught the marsh coneheads in early August. Gideon had relayed the news that some of the meadow katydids Nathan also had caught there were dusky-faced, one of the conservative species I had yet to find. The lead paid off.

The legs were totally green, unlike those of the familiar black-legged meadow katydid.

I caught a couple individuals to hold for close-ups.

The head of the dusky-faced meadow katydid is amber colored, with fine dots and lines of red-brown.

While wading the tall grasses and sedges I also spotted a different large meadow katydid with green legs and a beautiful yellow-green face.

Unfortunately I only saw the one, and the auto-focus on the camera frustrated my attempts at a clear photo before she flew away. Though blurred, the image provided enough information for identification.

This was another species on my conservative wetland singing insects want list: the delicate meadow katydid. So, what was so special about this place?

View of the edge of the portion of the Great Marsh under discussion.

For one thing, invasive Phragmites was absent, and cattails were limited to a few scattered plants. Grasses and sedges were the dominant plants. Black-legged meadow katydids were very few, and limited to the dry-soil edges of the wetland. The plants and katydids were zoned. Just inland from the water and mud-flat edge was a zone of shorter, finer grasses in which the only singing insects I saw were abundant slender meadow katydids. Then came taller grasses of intermediate coarseness, where the dusky-faced and delicate meadow katydids were, along with a few marsh coneheads.

Female marsh conehead

The soil became progressively less water saturated as the vegetation rings went outward. Next came a zone of very coarse sedges. The only species I saw in there was, surprisingly, a long-tailed meadow katydid (a tiny species dwarfed by the big triangular sedge stems).  Interspersed here were patches of taller grasses which contained more dusky-faced meadow katydids. This area gave me a strong image of good marsh habitat to carry as I continue to search for these insects in other places.

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