Southern Lessons

by Carl Strang

This year’s chapter in the series of annual bioblitzes organized by the Indiana Academy of Sciences took place at Eagle Creek Park in northern Indianapolis on June 2-3. This is early enough in the season that there were few singing insects for me to find, but I was able to gain valuable experience with two southern species that occur or have occurred in the Chicago region.

The first of these is the spring trig.

Female spring trig at Eagle Creek.

This species of tiny cricket first was described in 2014. That is surprising, given its abundance in southern Indiana and its extensive range beyond the state. It proved to be common in a range of habitats at Eagle Creek Park, from woodland edges to grassy meadows.

Spring trigs appear plain-faced to the eye, but bright light and magnification reveal a pattern of fine dark lines.

I learned more about the spring trig’s habitat, and found that I can hear them easily while driving at speeds of 30mph or less. This allowed me to get clarity on the species in the Chicago region. Driving in the southernmost counties, I found widely scattered small colonies in Fulton and Jasper counties, at road edges where wider bands of herbaceous plants were backed by woodlands. In the future I expect to find them in southern Pulaski and Newton counties, too, but not north of there.

Eagle Creek Park also has a large population of northern wood crickets.

The northern wood cricket is a forest species that is smaller and blacker than the spring field cricket, which could be heard chirping in the park’s meadow areas.

The spring field cricket is a few millimeters longer, typically has bronzy wings, and has a proportionately broader head and thorax.

Recordings I made during the bioblitz, and at home with a captive male, have provided further clarity on northern wood cricket song characteristics. Their chirps may never have 4 pulses (commonly 2 or 3), and almost never rise above 5 kHz in pitch, where spring field crickets often have 4-pulse chirps, and seldom drop below 5 kHz. Habitat also helps separate the two. I dug deeper into the literature, and learned more about historical records of the species in two Chicago region counties. Those observations were made in 1902, and I went to the sites in the weeks after the bioblitz. Northern wood crickets no longer occur there. I believe the records are correct, but that the crickets have gone extinct in those places. Northern wood crickets are reported to be sensitive to forest fragmentation, perhaps especially so in the northern fringe of their range, and such fragmentation clearly took place where they once were found in Lake and Marshall counties. I will continue to check the region’s larger surviving forest blocks, but it seems likely that the species no longer occurs in northern Indiana.

Incidentally, the other expected early-season singing insect, the green-striped grasshopper, lives in Eagle Creek Park’s meadows and prairie areas.

Next year’s bioblitz is expected to take place in one of my counties, and I am looking forward to the experience.

 

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1 Comment

  1. June 26, 2018 at 8:47 am

    Very nice Spring Trig photos, Carl!


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