Opening the Forest

by Carl Strang

As I mentioned in the January summary, a team is performing some restoration clearing in the northwest portion of the main forest at St. James Farm Forest Preserve. They are removing invasive buckthorn and honeysuckle shrubs, and taking down some dead trees.

The cleared area extends north to the open zone along the stream.

The cleared area extends north to the open zone along the stream.

Flagging tape in the photo’s upper right was there before this project began (an enlarged version of each photo appears if you click on it). A string of such markers follows the route of a proposed new trail in the preserve master plan. I imagine this clearing in part is setting the stage for that trail’s creation. If so, the removal of dead trees along that route is a safety measure.

Here you can see that beyond the clearing, the forest is choked with invasives. That is what much of the area looked like before the project began.

Here you can see that beyond the clearing, the forest is choked with invasives. That is what much of the area looked like before the project began.

Continuing a counterclockwise turn, this view shows the extent of the clearing. The pale area is an ash pile where cut brush was burned.

Continuing a counterclockwise turn, this view shows the extent of the clearing. The pale area is an ash pile where cut brush was burned.

A final view shows some of the large oaks that dominate this forest.

A final view shows some of the large oaks that dominate this forest.

I am very much looking forward to seeing what native plants will be released by this clearing. There is practically no garlic mustard evident here, so recovery could be swift.

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2 Comments

  1. bugman13 said,

    February 10, 2016 at 1:36 pm

    Why would they take down dead trees, just curious?

    • natureinquiries said,

      February 11, 2016 at 7:31 am

      It did seem strange, which is why I think it is for safety, to avoid having a tree fall on the crew doing the clearing (this project is going on for weeks), on workers constructing the trail whenever that begins, or ultimately on people using that trail. District policy is to leave dead trees standing unless they are close to a public trail, picnic ground or other recreation site, or service drive.


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