Nature Fest

by Carl Strang

The Centennial Bioblitz proceeded into much better weather on Saturday. All survey groups went out, many accompanied by embedded photographers, and before too long the data, social media and photo processing team had all they could handle.

The data entry table. Photos were selected for projection on a big screen in the science arena. This and the following photos by Marcy Rogge.

The data entry table. Photos were selected for projection on a big screen in the science arena. This and the following photos by Marcy Rogge.

The public side of the bioblitz, Nature Fest, opened at 11 a.m. The weather, setting and attractions drew nearly 2000 participants.

Most activities and exhibitors were in a long line, and the crowd was big enough to keep them all busy through the day.

Most activities and exhibitors were in a long line, and the crowd was big enough to keep them all busy through the day.

One of the most popular activities was created by Nikki Dahlin, my fellow naturalist at Mayslake, and Leslie Bertram from Fullersburg Woods. It was a walk-through insect key.

Nikki prepares a young entomologist to go out and catch a bug to identify with the key.

Nikki prepares a young entomologist to go out and catch a bug to identify with the key.

Their location beside a prairie plot provided good insect hunting grounds for participants. One of the signs for their key is in the foreground.

Their location beside a prairie plot provided good insect hunting grounds for participants. One of the signs for their key is in the foreground.

At the end of the day, scientists and volunteers were treated to a fine picnic feed. Survey team leaders provided highlight summaries.

The reports were MC’d by Scott Meister, who coordinated the science survey.

The reports were MC’d by Scott Meister, who coordinated the science survey.

As citizen science volunteer coordinator, I filled in for the birds team leader, who couldn’t make the picnic. By that point, after more than 24 hours’ concentrated activity with a sub-4-hour sleep break, I barely had 2 brain cells to rub together.

As citizen science volunteer coordinator, I filled in for the birds team leader, who couldn’t make the picnic. By that point, after more than 24 hours’ concentrated activity with a sub-4-hour sleep break, I barely had 2 brain cells to rub together.

Marcy Rogge, who provided these photos, was the overall event and logistics manager for the Centennial Bioblitz and Nature Fest. This brought her career with the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County to a satisfactory conclusion, as she retired a few days later.

 

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