Showy Insects at the Lights

by Carl Strang

The rain stopped for a while on the night of the Hills of Gold bioblitz in Johnson County, Indiana. I set my single ultraviolet light on a hilltop, following a muddy climb up a steep logging trail. My light faced a different downslope than the nearby, more elaborate multi-light array of the Purdue beetle team led by Jeff Holland. My aim was moths, and a satisfying variety came to the sheet lit by my UV tube. Today I will share photos of some of the more spectacular insects we found.

The biggest was this tulip-tree silkmoth which came to one of the Purdue lights.

The biggest was this tulip-tree silkmoth which came to one of the Purdue lights.

Two of these beautiful, strikingly marked green moths came to my station. Their English name is appropriate: green marvel.

Two of these beautiful, strikingly marked green moths came to my station. Their English name is appropriate: green marvel.

Another eye-catcher was this one, curiously named The Hebrew.

Another eye-catcher was this one, curiously named The Hebrew.

The unadorned carpet was one of the moths commonly encountered during the day. One came to the sheet as well.

The unadorned carpet was one of the moths commonly encountered during the day. One came to the sheet as well.

The splendid palpita has attractive patches of pinkish brown on all four wings.

The splendid palpita has attractive patches of pinkish brown on all four wings.

According to its page in the BugGuide website, the brown-spotted zale actually is a species complex containing several species distinguishable only by dissection.

According to its page in the BugGuide website, the brown-spotted zale actually is a species complex containing several species distinguishable only by dissection.

That last point may well be true of many of the moths of the North American forests. This is where I need to compromise my reluctance to collect insects. There are enough instances of sibling species or cryptic species among the moths that voucher specimens are necessary. Given the growth of DNA analysis, two specimens per species per site may be the standard I will need to follow, so that one or part of one could be sacrificed to future chemical analysis. From an ecological as well as an evolutionary standpoint, the existence of these cryptic species is an interesting problem that needs to be sorted out.

Of course, many insects other than moths came to my sheet. This fish fly appears to be Chauliodes pectinicornis.

Of course, many insects other than moths came to my sheet. This fish fly appears to be Chauliodes pectinicornis.

Several fiery searchers prowled my sheet and its vicinity. These large beetles are predators that frequently attack caterpillars.

Several fiery searchers prowled my sheet and its vicinity. These large beetles are predators that frequently attack caterpillars.

Next time I will elaborate on other moths that were drawn to the lights. These illustrate a number of additional points about forest moth populations.

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