A Last Hurrah, Maybe

by Carl Strang

A field excursion for singing insects took me back to Indiana on Friday. The sky was clear in the morning, with the temperature in the upper 50’s F, but conditions deteriorated back to October wind and clouds through the afternoon. As I drove back home I had the feeling that, except for noting last song dates for species I encounter while engaged in other activities, the 2014 field season is done. Nevertheless, I had picked up another 6 county records, bringing the year’s total to 101.

This female fork-tailed bush katydid was my first of that species for Pulaski County.

This female fork-tailed bush katydid was my first of that species for Pulaski County.

The kinked shape of the ovipositor’s dorsal edge, along with the insect’s small size, assured the identification. Note the teeth around the tip, used when cutting into plant tissue for egg laying.

The kinked shape of the ovipositor’s dorsal edge, along with the insect’s small size, assured the identification. Note the teeth around the tip, used when cutting into plant tissue for egg laying.

 

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1 Comment

  1. Lisa Rainsong said,

    October 20, 2014 at 10:30 am

    Congratulations on all those county records!


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