The Magic Swale

by Carl Strang

After a summer that seemed dominated by rain and cool weather, late September brought a period of sun and warmth, offering hope of salvaging a field season that had been, on the whole, uninspiring. The Bendix Woods bioblitz brought some good results, and I was happy with my experiences at Midewin and Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, so things were looking up. On my next stop I was passing a swale when I heard some curious songs through the SongFinder pitch-lowering device that led me to pause.

It doesn’t look like much in the photo, but this wet-bottomed depression had one quality increasingly hard to find in a wetland: a lack of invasive marsh plants.

It doesn’t look like much in the photo, but this wet-bottomed depression had one quality increasingly hard to find in a wetland: a lack of invasive marsh plants.

Long-tailed meadow katydids, not an everyday insect, were a good find, but they were not producing the mystery song.

Long-tailed meadow katydids, not an everyday insect, were a good find, but they were not producing the mystery song.

Reportedly a common species, the marsh meadow grasshopper had evaded my wish for a photo op until this day.

Reportedly a common species, the marsh meadow grasshopper had evaded my wish for a photo op until this day.

One of them stridulated before my eyes, rapidly raising and lowering its hind legs to scrape against the folded wings, producing the characteristic zuzz-zuzz-zuzz… of the slant-faced stridulating grasshopper subfamily.

The marsh meadow grasshopper provides yet another variation in the structural beauty of grasshoppers. The little rectangular shape above the antennae is one of the diagnostic features of this species.

The marsh meadow grasshopper provides yet another variation in the structural beauty of grasshoppers. The little rectangular shape above the antennae is one of the diagnostic features of this species.

Eventually the SongFinder led me to the singers in the swale. They will endure as the highlight of this year’s field season.

Stripe-faced meadow katydids!

Stripe-faced meadow katydids!

This is a species I have sought for years. The hints in the literature are vague in some ways, contradictory in others. I have slogged through marshes, bogs and marl in counties throughout the Chicago region, and yet here, where I would not have expected to find it, was a population of Orchelimum concinnum. They were beautiful, like the other wetland members of their genus, and well named with that ornamental stripe down the front of the head.

The stripe is not simple, but multicolored as you can see.

The stripe is not simple, but multicolored as you can see.

The song was faint to my ear. I needed to be within a few feet to hear it unaided. A few irregularly spaced ticks (3 or 4 in some individuals, 6 or 7 in others) led into a buzz a few seconds long. Increasingly I am leaning more and more on the SongFinder, but perhaps with that knowledge I will have more success in finding other populations of stripe-faced meadow katydids.

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2 Comments

  1. Lisa Rainsong said,

    October 3, 2014 at 1:14 pm

    Oh, wow! I had no idea the stripe would be so prominent and so colorful! What a beautiful katydid. I learn so much from your blog, Carl.

  2. Scott Namestnik said,

    October 5, 2014 at 12:06 am

    Great find, Carl!


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