Return to Midewin

by Carl Strang

Recently I spent an enjoyable afternoon at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, in Will County, Illinois. My main target was a swale in the northwestern portion of the property.

In one place the swale expands into a ponded area that in this wet year was around 50m wide and a few hundred long.

In one place the swale expands into a ponded area that in this wet year was around 50m wide and a few hundred long.

I added 3 county species records in and around the swale, but all are common in the region and so not the exciting rarities I’d hoped for.

This Forbes’s tree cricket was one of the three. It was perhaps the darkest individual I have seen in Illinois, and more typical of the Indiana coloration in my experience.

This Forbes’s tree cricket was one of the three. It was perhaps the darkest individual I have seen in Illinois, and more typical of the Indiana coloration in my experience.

As I returned to my car, wading through a nicely developing restored prairie, I spotted an unfamiliar grasshopper.

It held still while I took side and dorsal photographs. The color pattern and sculpturing pointed to the band-winged grasshopper subfamily.

It held still while I took side and dorsal photographs. The color pattern and sculpturing pointed to the band-winged grasshopper subfamily.

Note the white X marking on the pronotum (dorsal thorax). That rang a bell, and ultimately helped with the identification.

Note the white X marking on the pronotum (dorsal thorax). That rang a bell, and ultimately helped with the identification.

Unfortunately the hopper evaded me when I tried to catch it so as to check out the hind wing color. As I continued to walk out I saw a couple displaying grasshoppers with bright yellow hind wings, which I was unable to see up close. I made the assumption that they were the same as the photographed hopper, but this proved not to be the case. It turned out to have been a dusky grasshopper, Encoptolophus sordidus, which has an essentially colorless hind wing. It was the first of that species I have found, which always is exciting, but now I know there’s also a yellow-winged species I will have to go back and hunt down on a future visit.

While I was photographing the dusky grasshopper, a nearby movement caught my eye, and led me to a new experience. It was a ballooning spider, half an inch long. I had heard of this but never seen it, and did not expect that such a large individual could travel in that way. The spider sends out a strand of silk which grabs the wind and carries the spider through the air.

The spider had landed on a stalk, and paused long enough for me to get some photos. I haven’t had time yet to try for an ID.

The spider had landed on a stalk, and paused long enough for me to get some photos. I haven’t had time yet to try for an ID.

The spider didn’t wait long before it turned to face into the wind.

The spider didn’t wait long before it turned to face into the wind.

It began shooting out new strands of silk, obviously not satisfied that it had traveled far enough.

It began shooting out new strands of silk, obviously not satisfied that it had traveled far enough.

As I continued my walk to the car I noticed several strands of silk streaming from plant tops, and felt that I had learned something new about them.

I’ll close with a couple photos from other parts of Midewin.

This female short-winged green grasshopper was a county record.

This female short-winged green grasshopper was a county record.

A female fall field cricket posed nicely on a trail.

A female fall field cricket posed nicely on a trail.

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2 Comments

  1. Lisa Rainsong said,

    October 1, 2014 at 10:37 am

    Thanks for including this Forbes Tree Cricket photo, I’m definitely going to check my lighter Black-horned Tree Crickets closely and photograph them. Do you have Black-horned Tree Crickets in your area?

    • natureinquiries said,

      October 2, 2014 at 6:17 am

      Hi, Lisa,
      I am following Laurel Symes’ results on that question. According to what she found during her travels, only Forbes’s occur in the area I am surveying.


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