Confused

by Carl Strang

This year there seem to be more confused ground crickets than I have noticed before in DuPage and neighboring counties. Furthermore, their habitat range seems broader. Here is a case in point. A couple weeks ago I was paying the year’s first visit to Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in Will County. Across one of the interior roads from a grove of trees was a meadow undergoing restoration to prairie, and in that meadow edge a confused ground cricket was singing.

This was the opposite of the species’ typical woodland setting.

This was the opposite of the species’ typical woodland setting.

I moved in closer to see exactly where the cricket was and found, between the bases of the plants, a little pocket of accumulated cottonwood leaves from last year.

This apparently was sufficient microhabitat to suit him.

This apparently was sufficient microhabitat to suit him.

There have been plenty of other instances of meadows with confused ground crickets in DuPage, Will and Kendall Counties. Almost always there are at least scattered trees nearby. The song is distinctive enough that I don’t think it’s a matter of me missing them in the past. Whether this is a 1-year increase, the result perhaps of favorable winter conditions, remains to be seen. This area is close to the northern range boundary for confused ground crickets, so another possibility is that this is evidence of yet another range expansion from the south.

Confused ground cricket

Confused ground cricket

Another sound-location combination that surprised me happened last week. I was driving home from an evening walk at Danada Forest Preserve when I heard what seemed to be a robust conehead, within 2 miles of my home on a road I frequently drive. I turned around, parked, and found it.

Robust conehead from a previous year

Robust conehead from a previous year

It was indeed a robust conehead, practically deafening at close range and with the typical short cone lacking black coloration. A second male sang nearby. These were far from the only DuPage County population I know about. This was, however, in a section of Butterfield Road that was rebuilt in the past few years, and there has been much landscaping in the median and along both edges. It seems almost certain that the eggs from which these coneheads hatched were carried in on nursery material. I’ll be interested in seeing if a new disjunct population builds in that spot.

 

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