Mayslake Lepidoptera!

by Carl Strang

I added the exclamation point in the title to fill a gap left by our punctuational butterflies. Eastern commas are usually fairly common at Mayslake Forest Preserve.

This recent example shows the source of the butterfly’s name: a contrasting silver or white mark on the underside of the wing is reminiscent of a comma.

This recent example shows the source of the butterfly’s name: a contrasting silver or white mark on the underside of the wing is reminiscent of a comma.

The week before, I thought that one of the comma’s less frequent relatives appeared.

There seems to be a separation here, a curved line plus a dot.

There seems to be a separation here, a curved line plus a dot.

Later I had to conclude that this was a question mark wannabe, a comma with a disruption in its namesake line. This was made clear by the upper wing pattern.

The pattern of black spots on the forewing is that of an eastern comma.

The pattern of black spots on the forewing is that of an eastern comma.

There have been appearances by two different moths in the same genus, and no ambiguity in this case.

This was a LeConte’s haploa on June 9. Note the gaps in the dark lines at the corners of the wings.

This was a LeConte’s haploa on June 9. Note the gaps in the dark lines at the corners of the wings.

Ten days later a reversed haploa appeared. The dark lines are connected.

Ten days later a reversed haploa appeared. The dark lines are connected.

These are tiger moths that commonly emerge this time of year, and I continue to see individuals of both species at Mayslake. The haploa caterpillars generally feed on a wide variety of plants, but I have no information on their local diet range.

Another common moth is the large lace border, one of the geometrid or inchworm moths.

Not a big moth, contrary to the name, wingspan perhaps an inch.

Not a big moth, contrary to the name, wingspan perhaps an inch.

Again, the relative abundance of this species probably is tied to its broad dietary range, which includes plants in several families.

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