Sound Ideas: Early Season Katydids

by Carl Strang

The start of the singing insect season still is a couple months away, but among the early species will be the three katydids I am featuring today. They are relatively hardy, hatching very early in the spring and developing quickly. Two of them, Roesel’s katydid and the protean shieldback, are known as predaceous katydids, and their dietary focus on animals is what allows them to get going so early. The gladiator meadow katydid is the earliest of its species group to hatch, and so the earliest to begin singing. The meadow katydids are generalists, and the gladiator probably has a greater proportion of animal foods in its diet than the others. Roesel’s katydid is a European species, introduced in the Montreal area and spreading south, east and west from there.

Roesel’s is the only katydid in the Chicago area with a color pattern anything like this.

Roesel’s is the only katydid in the Chicago area with a color pattern anything like this.

Its song is a long, fast, constant buzz:

I am at an age where I have a little more difficulty hearing this one each year. The pitch rises with temperature, and on a hot mid-day I now need the SongFinder pitch-altering device to hear individuals that are audible in the morning and late afternoon.

The protean shieldback, like Roesel’s katydid, is a species of the meadows, but also is common in brushy areas and open woodlands.

Protean shieldback female. This is a relatively heavy-bodied katydid

Protean shieldback female. This is a relatively heavy-bodied katydid

Its song is an extended buzz, but has much more of a slower, rattling quality than Roesel’s song.

It is not as loud as it may seem from the recording, but is not really difficult to hear. The protean shieldback begins singing in mid- to late afternoon, and continues into the night.

The gladiator meadow katydid is similar in appearance to other large meadow katydids.

This photo shows why the meadow katydids once were known as “long-horned grasshoppers.”

This photo shows why the meadow katydids once were known as “long-horned grasshoppers.”

The gladiator meadow katydid’s variation on the generalized tick-and-buzz meadow katydid song pattern de-emphasizes the tick portion. I often don’t notice ticks at all, though they may be softly produced more often than I suspect, as in the following recording:

The buzz is similar in quality to the protean shieldback’s song, but it is shorter in length, rhythmically produced, and the volume rises at the end.

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