Sound Ideas: Trilling Tree Crickets

by Carl Strang

Today I wish to share recordings of 4 species of our tree crickets, which have in common songs that are continuous (rather than interrupted) trills. I will order them along a typical habitat gradient, from grasses to mixed grasses and forbs to mixed forbs and shrubs to trees (specifically, conifers).

The four-spotted tree cricket seems to prefer to sing from grass stems.

Four-spotted tree crickets are pale.

Four-spotted tree crickets are pale.

The song is a continuous clear trill:

Very abundant late in the season, Forbes’s tree cricket prefers forbs or vines.

Forbes’s tree cricket is highly variable, but usually has some dark markings.

Forbes’s tree cricket is highly variable, but usually has some dark markings.

Here is a recording from last year:

There is an interesting issue surrounding these first two songs, in my mind. I know of other singing insect students who, like me, at least sometimes can distinguish the songs of four-spotted and Forbes’s tree crickets, but we describe them with different language. To me, the four-spotted’s song has more of a clear, tone-like quality, while the Forbes’s song has a discordant tone that others apparently don’t hear. Others point to the difference in pulse rate (much faster in Forbes’s, but I need a computer analysis of a recording to tell that difference). This is the best example I have found of how describing insect songs in words can be difficult, and may in some cases be impossible.

Woodland shrubby understories to masses of forbs in open places near wooded edges are habitat for our third species, the broad-winged tree cricket. Here is its song:

Broad-winged tree crickets are distinguished by the wide wings and the raspberry coloration on the head and antenna bases.

Broad-winged tree crickets are distinguished by the wide wings and the raspberry coloration on the head and antenna bases.

To my ear, this song has a richer tone, and usually is lower in pitch than other trilling tree crickets at the same temperature.

I’ll close with the pine tree cricket, perhaps the most beautiful of the four.

The red-browns and pale greens provide good camouflage in a habitat of coniferous trees.

The red-browns and pale greens provide good camouflage in a habitat of coniferous trees.

The following recording was made indoors, from a caged male (you can hear the splashing of the aquarium pump in the background):

Again the trill is continuous and similar to the others, especially the four-spotted tree cricket, but the source of the sound in a pine, spruce or cedar (usually in a grove of them) is a dead give-away.

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2 Comments

  1. February 10, 2014 at 4:33 pm

    The Forbes’s song reminds me a lot of the Black-horned Tree Cricket. This will not make the challenge any easier when I get a chance to listen for them in western Ohio! I understand what you mean about the somewhat discordant sound, which to my ear is true for both the Forbes’s and the Black-horned. I wonder how much of that is from the pulse rate and how much might be from the specific overtones that are emphasized. It would be interesting to be able to see this.

    The Two-spotted Tree Cricket, in my opinion, would be the King of Dissonance.

    • natureinquiries said,

      February 11, 2014 at 7:09 am

      Thanks, Lisa. So you do hear it, too. Overtones certainly would be one possibility. Also, the odd ability of tree cricket wings to have different sections vibrate at different temperatures makes me wonder if different wing parts might be vibrating simultaneously, producing different frequencies, at least at certain temperatures (and therefore at different pulse rates).


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