McHenry County Singing Insects

by Carl Strang

On Saturday I traveled north to McHenry County, Illinois, to continue my regional survey of singing insects. That county is blessed with some impressive sites, and I was able to cover only parts of two of them. Moraine Hills State Park has a wide range of representative habitats covering large acreages.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Wetlands in particular dominate the landscape.

Much of the park is spanned by a network of bike paths, and my next survey trip there will involve my bike. I also paid a visit to a McHenry County Conservation District property, Glacial Park.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

When I think of Glacial Park I think of glorious vistas.

There are savannas, restored prairie, and wetlands of varied quality.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

This marsh looks very good, at least around the edges.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog so far is holding its own against a fringing ring of reed canary grass.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The bog is rich in sphagnum moss, but was quiet on Saturday, so I hope to find sphagnum ground crickets singing when I return in a month or so.

The species count for McHenry County totaled 16, the list mainly overlapping that for Kendall County from the previous day. The differences were interesting, though. Where the day at Kendall was dominated by omnipresent choruses of lyric cicadas, I did not hear a single member of that species in McHenry. At some point I will follow a couple rivers north and south to find the current range limit for that species, which is common in DuPage County not far south of McHenry.

The McHenry woodlands had rattler round-wing katydids, which I did not find in Kendall County, but the latter had Nebraska coneheads which I did not find in McHenry County. I need to find a drier, more open woodland in Kendall County, but the Nebraska conehead likely is a species which, like the lyric cicada, has its northern range limit somewhere between those two counties.

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