Mayslake Birds Update

by Carl Strang

We have entered the time when most birds are focused on raising young. It is much quieter at Mayslake Forest Preserve now that territories are established and the effort of feeding nestlings occupies the parents’ time and energy.

This Baltimore oriole’s nest hangs above the trail near the northeast corner of Mays’ Lake.

This Baltimore oriole’s nest hangs above the trail near the northeast corner of Mays’ Lake.

The nest is sufficiently concealed by black cherry leaves that its composition is difficult to read, but I would be surprised if it is not constructed largely of fishing line, as has been the case for all recent oriole nests there.

Red-winged blackbirds are ever-ready to cuss out any person who comes anywhere near their nests.

Red-winged blackbirds are ever-ready to cuss out any person who comes anywhere near their nests.

The preserve’s pair of eastern kingbirds is much quieter than they were before nesting.

The preserve’s pair of eastern kingbirds is much quieter than they were before nesting.

Some broods already have fledged.

Yesterday this tree swallow brood occupied a dead tree at the stream corridor marsh.

Yesterday this tree swallow brood occupied a dead tree at the stream corridor marsh.

A final, sad note was the find of a dead chimney swift in Mayslake Hall.

It’s not clear how the swift got inside, or how a bird that nests in dark chimneys could have met its end in a room as spacious as the Event Hall.

It’s not clear how the swift got inside, or how a bird that nests in dark chimneys could have met its end in a room as spacious as the Event Hall.

Swifts have stiff tail feathers, which they use to prop themselves against interior chimney walls.

Swifts have stiff tail feathers, which they use to prop themselves against interior chimney walls.

I took the swift to Willowbrook, which periodically delivers specimens to the bird department at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.

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