Mayslake Animal Update

by Carl Strang

Every season contains the seeds of the next, and this was very true at Mayslake Forest Preserve last week. The migration season is well under way, though mainly it still features species that wintered in the southern U.S. rather than the tropics.

This winter wren was a classic example. Its kind invented skulking, but this one came out for a few seconds into plain sight.

This winter wren was a classic example. Its kind invented skulking, but this one came out for a few seconds into plain sight.

This male yellow-rumped warbler, in contrast, was not hiding. The challenge with him was that he seldom held still for more than a second. There was always another insect to chase.

This male yellow-rumped warbler, in contrast, was not hiding. The challenge with him was that he seldom held still for more than a second. There was always another insect to chase.

The wren and the warbler both nest well to the north, and will be with us only a short time.

Home hunting was another theme. The first bumblebee queen I saw this year was a Bombus bimaculatus.

She didn’t hold still, and didn’t stick around for long, but the yellow center of the second abdominal segment is visible in this blurry photo.

She didn’t hold still, and didn’t stick around for long, but the yellow center of the second abdominal segment is visible in this blurry photo.

Bumblebee queens in spring are probing for holes in the ground where they can start their colonies. Some animals make their own holes, and I found what may be a test dig by Mayslake’s pair of coyotes.

It was in an elevated site, and the hole was a foot in diameter, but not yet completely excavated. I’ll check on it occasionally. Coyotes only use dens to shelter their young.

It was in an elevated site, and the hole was a foot in diameter, but not yet completely excavated. I’ll check on it occasionally. Coyotes only use dens to shelter their young.

The abundance of the growing season still is in the future for most, however.

This fox squirrel was making do with some dried rose hips from the bush outside my office window.

This fox squirrel was making do with some dried rose hips from the bush outside my office window.

Clearly we are in a season of promise and preparation.

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