Still Winter at Mayslake

by Carl Strang

The calendar claims that spring has arrived, but it’s still winter at Mayslake. A while back I mentioned my 6 seasons framework for northeast Illinois. The first of March brings the start of our sixth season, Late Winter. I once held too rigidly to the idea that Late Winter ends in mid-April, but especially after last year I feel the need to modify the framework and acknowledge that this season is variable in length. I have an idea of how to mark the end of Late Winter, which I will share later. For now, it is shaping up to be a relatively late spring. Consider the lake ice at Mayslake Forest Preserve. This year the ice was thick enough to support people, though few took advantage of the opportunity.

Forest Preserve District rangers placed these fish structures out on the Mays’ Lake ice early in March.

Forest Preserve District rangers placed these fish structures out on the Mays’ Lake ice early in March.

In my previous 4 springs at Mayslake, the latest there was ice on the lakes was March 18. This year it has been slow to depart.

Mays’ Lake was almost entirely ice covered on March 13.

Mays’ Lake was almost entirely ice covered on March 13.

By March 19 the fish structures had sunk, but the lake still was largely in ice. The previous late date for lake ice in my 5 years at Mayslake was March 18. The ice still was there through yesterday (the 21st).

By March 19 the fish structures had sunk, but the lake still was largely in ice. The previous late date for lake ice in my 5 years at Mayslake was March 18. The ice still was there through yesterday (the 21st).

Meanwhile the stream corridor marsh, though open and frozen in turns, has filled to capacity and beyond.

The marsh on March 6.

The marsh on March 6.

Snows have allowed the continued opportunity for tracking.

A mink has been passing through the preserve on a weekly basis.

A mink has been passing through the preserve on a weekly basis.

A pair of coyotes has been a more regular presence on the preserve as well, as have red-tailed hawks. I am thinking I should soon conduct a search for a new den and a new nest, respectively. It has become clear, though, that if the great horned owls are nesting this year, they are off the preserve to the south.

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