Killdeer Dossier

by Carl Strang

As in past winters I have been sharing my collected observations on various vertebrate species over the years. While this may have some value in providing information, and revealing how there can be a difference between one person’s experienced knowledge and the collective accumulation of information available through references, the main point is to encourage you to pay more attention to the familiar and to build your own knowledge base of personally gained information.

Killdeer

Killdeer

This plover generally occurs in large, short grass fields and pastures. It produces a loud “killdee” call, often repeated in clusters. Small downy young can produce this call at surprisingly loud volume. The parent has broken-wing distraction display. Practically all of them depart from northern Illinois and northern Indiana for the winter, but a few remained through the winter near open streams in pastures in south central Pennsylvania. Mudflats also are frequented for feeding purposes and in migration. Killdeers have a very smooth, rapid run over the ground.

Killdeer nests are simple scrapes in the ground, containing 4 mottled eggs. The nest site generally is chosen such that the eggs are well camouflaged.

4JL86. Jeffersonville, Indiana. A pair on a golf course ran ahead of me. They stopped about 20m away from me, and settled into small depressions in the lawn (small bare soil patches) exactly as though settling onto eggs. If I approached, they quickly got up and ran ahead of me; no eggs or young were there. If I approached very slowly, the bird slightly spread its wings and tail, and went into the broken-wing display.

15MR87. 3 calling killdeers flew high over Meacham Grove, west to east, the first of the year.

4AP99. First killdeer of the year I’ve seen in DuPage County.

1AU99. Swenson’s Road pond, Fermilab. A couple killdeers walked at the water’s edge in an upright posture, only occasionally reaching down to the surface.

Killdeers seldom enter the water.

30OC99. Several killdeers still are at Fermilab.

26DE99. A killdeer was on the shore at Lake Maxinkuckee, Culver, Indiana. Broken ice sheet pieces were floating along the shore, and there was some snow on the ground.

20OC00. Killdeers flew over the Maxinkuckee Wetlands, calling loudly as they flew over the area for an extended period of time. The flight seemed to be a display.

22OC00. Many killdeers were at the marsh in south Blackwell Forest Preserve (and only 1 at McKee Marsh in north Blackwell). Two appeared to be involved in an agonistic display, standing a few inches apart and bowing forward until their breasts nearly touched the ground, calling, holding their tails straight and sometimes fanning them, sometimes pacing around. Once one appeared to bite or peck toward the other.

The killdeer’s long tail, folded here, is largely a bright reddish color.

21JL01. Fermilab. Half a dozen killdeers at the Swenson Road pond are mainly staying well back on the drier mud.

13NO01. A couple killdeers still are at Rice Lake, Danada Forest Preserve.

1AU04. Greene Valley. A shallow large pond at 83rd Street and Rt. 53 has attracted many shorebirds. Pectoral sandpipers nearly all are feeding in the shallowest water with the vertical sewing-machine bill motions. A number of lesser yellowlegs are in slightly deeper water. On the mudflats are many killdeers, a couple spotted sandpipers and a solitary sandpiper. Between mudflats and the very shallowest water, several peeps (appear to be mainly least sandpipers).

The killdeer nest mentioned on April 18, 2009.

18AP09. Killdeer incubating a nest in mulch around a tree in the picnic area, Tri-County State Park.

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3 Comments

  1. Linda Padera said,

    February 25, 2012 at 10:50 am

    Carl, I enjoyed your well-timed Killdeer Dossier. They are just starting to arrive again in northern Illinois. Did you get a chance to observe the overwintering Killdeer at Hidden Lake?

    Linda Padera

    • natureinquiries said,

      February 27, 2012 at 6:49 am

      Hi, Linda,
      No I didn’t, but now that you mention it I heard one earlier this month as I ran past a field in Warrenville. (Not a starling.)
      Regards,
      Carl

  2. February 26, 2012 at 4:52 pm

    I also saw them in two locations in St. Joseph County, Indiana today.


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