Dragonfly Monitoring Run

by Carl Strang

On the 4th of July I made my first dragonfly monitoring run of the year, on my assigned stretch of the Des Plaines River at Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. With a total of 378 individual dragonflies and damselflies tallied, it was far higher than any other count since I took this route beginning in2009. Of course, there was a lot more to enjoy than just Odonata.

A string of great blue heron nests between the boat launch and the start of my route still had some youngsters approaching fledging. Their loud rhythmic guttural calls signaled the arrival of a parent, back from fishing the river.

The carp fence I saw under construction when I last paddled the Des Plaines in the fall is complete. Am I being ignorant or properly skeptical in doubting this will achieve the desired result of keeping Asian carp from moving between waterways?

My thinking, for what it’s worth, is that even if the mesh is fine enough to block tiny youngsters that might slip through at flood stage, there will be breaches from floating logs.

Later, when my run was nearly complete, I encountered this northern water snake.

I was surprised that it seemed undisturbed by my close approach. Then I saw that the eyes were obscured. The snake either was on the verge of shedding, or the scales over the eyes remained stuck when the rest of the skin came off during the last shed.

Entertaining as these sideshows were, dragonflies and damselflies were the main event. Jade clubtails were the most abundant of the 5 species of dragonflies that day; I counted 46 altogether.

Jade clubtails mainly are to be seen perched on objects like this stump.

Common whitetails also were regular sights, some laying eggs.

Here a male common whitetail shares a stump with a bluet and a clubtail.

Most of the individuals were damselflies, however, in 8 species. The largest were a few American rubyspots.

This one was so steadfast that I was able to bring the camera to within a few inches of it.

The largest count of any species was 108 blue-tipped dancers. I didn’t get a photo of any of them, but one of the 82 powdered dancers, a close relative, posed on my deck line.

Such accommodating individuals make identification easy.

The most abundant bluets this time were stream bluets.

The stream bluet is one of the black-type bluets, having a mainly black abdomen.

Stream bluets and hordes of dancers were laying eggs in floating vegetation mats.

The several tandem pairs, perched on the vegetation and laying, may not be as visible here as the unattached and hopeful males hovering above.

I had thought I might do a little fishing on the way back, but the time and mental effort required to identify and count so many insects left me glad simply to paddle back up to the put-in.

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