The American Snout, and More

by Carl Strang

One of my favorite animal names is “American snout.” It calls forth the image of some disembodied nose floating in space. In fact it’s a reference to a butterfly with a long forward extension of its head.

This butterfly was the first of its kind I have observed at Mayslake Forest Preserve. It is more common south of us. In references you may find its species name as carinenta or bachmanii; the genus is Libytheana, and there is only one North American species.

Another preserve first was this brightly colored beetle.

The milkweed leaf beetle, like so many consumers of milkweed, has bright orange colors. These warn potential predators of the possibility of poisons the insect may have sequestered from its diet.

I saw a couple bluets that had the relatively large size and the color pattern of familiar bluets.

The males had this violet coloration, though; my guess is that they had recently emerged as adults and would be changing colors soon.

I have been seeing more Virginia ctenucha moths than usual this year, at Mayslake and elsewhere.

That’s the way it is with some insects, having occasional years with higher numbers.

Of course, a major goal of all these adult insects is to find a mate and produce eggs.

For this pair of least skippers, it’s so far, so good.

On Friday I finally saw the first Peck’s skipper of the year.

The pattern of light spots beneath the hindwing is distinctive for this species.

It’s been a good year for insects, so far.

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