Brown Creeper Species Dossier

by Carl Strang

This week I am sharing my species dossier for the brown creeper, a species which seems increasingly to be present in DuPage County through the winters in recent years. I wrote the initial paragraph in 1986 as I established the dossier, then added observations with their date codes.

Brown Creeper

Observed during migration in DuPage Co., sometimes all winter there and in Culver. Latest spring observation 13AP86 [April 13, 1986]. When foraging they commonly fly to the base of a tree and work their way up, climbing on and searching the bark. Often when changing trees they produce a high-pitched cheeping contact call as they fly.

1AP87. First of year seen at Pratts Wayne F.P.

12MR88. First of year at McDowell.

28AP88. Migrants still present.

14AP89. Creepers at Hartz Lake.

18AP90. Creeper on 6-inch box elder at Willowbrook.

31JA99. First of year at McDowell.

1AP99. Willowbrook’s first of year. Also seen there on 5AP.

1OC99. First fall migrant at Willowbrook.

26MR00. Several observed at West DuPage Woods Forest Preserve. All but 1 foraging selectively on white oaks, flying to within 3 feet of the ground on the main trunk and working up it, staying on the shaded side (sunny afternoon) and within an 8-inch width, mainly going straight up even over bumps. When up in crown, fly down to base of next tree. High-pitched contact calls similar in pitch and tonal quality to those of golden-crowned kinglets. One paused to preen body feathers on anterior part of body, remaining perched on vertical bark while doing so. The only one on another species of tree was on a black cherry. During the brief time I watched, it both came into the sun briefly and exceeded the 8-inch path width.

27MR00. Willowbrook. A number of golden‑crowned kinglets and 3 brown creepers observed. Kinglet contact notes usually more emphatic, in groups of 3 or 4. Creeper notes similar in pitch and tone, but a little fainter, more drawn out, and single notes evenly spaced as the bird flies between trees (spacing a little greater than the notes of the kinglets).

31MR00. Waterfall Glen. Brown creepers feeding along Sawmill Creek, with golden-crowned kinglets and a couple white-breasted nuthatches nearby (essentially a bird desert for more than half a mile until I reached this point). One feeding on a 6″dbh hackberry, going straight up the shaded side (sunny afternoon). Either the same bird on several similar sized hackberries, or several birds on same, always staying shaded side except for brief moments in the sun. When that happened, though, the creeper quickly returned to the shaded side of the stem. Once a creeper paused briefly, made a flycatcher-like sally from the bark into the air, reached with its head and beak at the turn-around point, then returned to the same point on the stem it had left. Flew out 3 feet or so. Another creeper was moving up the shaded side of an 18″ white oak, every few seconds reaching its bill to the bark and then making eating motions. Another creeper on a 12″ forked tree spent some time on the sun side (= side toward creek) of one fork, but the other larger fork was shading it.

1AP00. Morton Arboretum, Heritage Trail. A mixed flock with at least 1 brown creeper and 2-3 chickadees; juncos and robin nearby. Overcast day, no shaded side, but creeper still mainly going straight up the trunk. When defecating, lifts tail high, bending it well over back. When searching, doesn’t probe but rather peers, looking into crevices and going to different angles to do so as needed. Song “tsee-er-tser-tseree,” quick, high pitched like call but not as thin, sweet and musical tone. On a white oak, spiraled up a high 8″ branch.

13AP00. Willowbrook. 1 brown creeper observed.

13AP07. Brown creeper vocalizations include a rough call similar to that of cedar waxwing, faint thin high pitched notes given singly, and several such notes given in quick succession and similar to those of golden-crowned kinglet but a little fainter and more irregularly spaced.

2JA08. First creeper of the year, at Fullersburg (two stuck around for weeks afterward).

29AP08. Last creeper of the spring, at Fullersburg.

21OC08. Fullersburg. First creeper, fall migration.

29JA09. Mayslake. First creeper of the year.

25FE09. Mayslake. Another creeper, after a space of nearly a month, suggesting midwinter wandering.

25MR09. Mayslake. Another month between sightings.

21AP09. Mayslake. Final creeper of the spring at Mayslake (often present in past month)

29OC09. Mayslake. First creeper of the fall migration.

8JA10. Mayslake. Creepers seen in two locations.

1FE10. Mayslake. Another creeper, after a space of nearly a month.

19MR10. Mayslake. First spring migrant creeper.

13AP10. Mayslake. Last spring migrant creeper.

13OC10. Mayslake. First fall migrant creeper.

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