Arboreal Tree Cricket Songs

by Carl Strang

This year I finally was able to resolve my confusion about the songs of three arboreal tree crickets. The first breakthrough came from observing singing male two-spotted tree crickets, as I mentioned in an earlier post.

Two-spotted tree cricket (male)

After further study I developed a description of the two-spotted tree cricket song that I feel confident about. Their songs are composed of variable-length trills, 1 second to 7 seconds or longer duration. Spaces between trills can be very short or longer, but when longer usually are filled by a stuttering sound. Often their song seems more discordant or strained than those of the others. Both two-spotted and narrow-winged tree cricket songs are distinctly higher pitched than the song of a common reference, the snowy tree cricket, but not necessarily well separated from one another. When there is a slight difference, the two-spotted has the slightly higher pitch.

Narrow-winged tree cricket

Trill length and the spaces between trills are very consistent in narrow-wings, forming a regular rhythm, unlike the variable two-spotteds. Spaces between always are distinct, longer than the brief pauses most characteristic of two-spotteds, and do not contain stutters. The trills are brief, a couple of seconds long. There was a difference in when the species started, with the first two-spotted singing at the beginning of August, narrow-wings not beginning until the end of the month. Both species continued to the end of September.

On two occasions I heard what could only be a Davis’s tree cricket. The long continuous trill, lower pitched than that of the snowy’s song, occasionally was broken. The cricket was well up in an ash tree. Though I only heard this one, I now suspect that I seldom hear them because their usual location is high in trees, according to the literature, where the higher-pitched chorus of other nocturnal crickets may obscure their songs. The lower pitch and much longer trill matches written descriptions in the literature, if not reference recordings (which give the impression that trills are more interrupted than in fact they are). For reference recordings, go to the Singing Insects of North America website or the Songs of Insects website.

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