Sights Along the Way

by Carl Strang

It has been a memorable few weeks. This year I took the bulk of my vacation time in the heart of the singing insect season, mid-August to mid-September, and spent most of it traveling around the 22-county area, from southwest Michigan to southeast Wisconsin, where I am seeking the 100 species of cicadas, crickets, katydids and singing grasshoppers that occur (at least potentially) there. This travel took me to many memorable places.

High quality forests are scattered around the region. Sanders Park, Racine County, Wisconsin.

High quality forests are scattered around the region. Sanders Park, Racine County, Wisconsin.

I didn’t spend a lot of time in the forests, however, much as I love them. Most singing insects live in more open habitats.

The dunes around the edge of Lake Michigan provided some of the most open habitats. Warren Dunes State Park, Michigan.

The dunes around the edge of Lake Michigan provided some of the most open habitats. Warren Dunes State Park, Michigan.

One of my favorite areas was Miller Woods at the western end of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.

The trail leads through savanna and past wetlands. Here it crosses a former rail foundation.

The trail leads through savanna and past wetlands. Here it crosses a former rail foundation.

The Miller Woods Trail eventually skirts a large pond at the edge of the dunes, and reaches the beach.

The Miller Woods Trail eventually skirts a large pond at the edge of the dunes, and reaches the beach.

Wetlands included Bluff Creek in the Kettle Moraine State Forest, Walworth County, Wisconsin.

The water was beautiful and clear, flowing over stones and gravel.

The water was beautiful and clear, flowing over stones and gravel.

A fen-like wetland, bordering the creek, contained species such as the fringed gentian.

A fen-like wetland, bordering the creek, contained species such as the fringed gentian.

Sure, I was paying attention to species other than singing insects. At the Houghton Lake Nature Conservancy property in Marshall County, Indiana, I encountered a couple interesting ones.

A Chinese mantis nymph stalked through the wetland vegetation.

A Chinese mantis nymph stalked through the wetland vegetation.

This gray treefrog snoozed in a leaf bed.

This gray treefrog snoozed in a leaf bed.

The most extensive prairie I encountered was in the Bong Recreation Area, Kenosha County, Wisconsin.

Its size alone speaks to the potential in this restoration project.

Its size alone speaks to the potential in this restoration project.

For now I will close with the sunset on my last evening at Bong.

The sunset was a beautiful prelude to a rainy evening in camp.

The sunset was a beautiful prelude to a rainy evening in camp.

The singing insects of course were the focus of all this travel. I’ll share images of some of them in future posts.

Late Season Insects at Mayslake

by Carl Strang

A couple days ago I put a finish on the floral season at Mayslake Forest Preserve. Today I’ll shake a few late insect photos out of the camera. We’ll start with some Odonata.

Green darner b

At Mayslake as elsewhere, hundreds of common green darners paused in their migration to hunt above the prairies and meadows. Migrating south is thought to be worthwhile for them and other large, strong dragonflies as they can extend their breeding season and spread their genes over a larger area. The various saddlebags species also migrate. Here is a UFO shot of a Carolina saddlebags that graced the mansion lawn area one day.

Carolina saddlebags 2b

A darner that shows up in a lot of places late in the summer is the shadow darner.

Shadow darner 3b

That vertical perching posture is typical. Common milkweeds have been hosting a late-season caterpillar, the milkweed tussock caterpillar.

Milkweed tussock moth caterpillar b

They are larvae of a tiger moth. I’ll close with a predator. This Chinese mantis assumed a cheerleading pose.

Chinese mantis 1b

Then, it began to groom its hunting apparatus.

Chinese mantis 2b

Earlier I showed an egg mass, which is how the species overwinters. Soon all the insects will be going into their various dormant forms to survive the long, cold, dry months of winter.

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