Testing the Birds and Buckthorn Hypothesis

by Carl Strang

A year ago I posted a hypothesis that this most unusual of seasons will allow me to test. To recap: When restored savannas are compared to woodlands with buckthorn and honeysuckle thickets in the understory in early May, when the bird migration is entering its peak, it seems that the birds prefer the invasive-degraded areas to the native savannas. Some birders take this as evidence that restoration is bad for birds. My hypothesis was that this observation is tied to the fact that oaks, the dominant trees in our savannas and woodlands, are among the latest trees to break bud and leaf out. Therefore they are not supporting leaf-eating insects, and also not providing the shelter that the birds need on their daytime migratory stops. As I pointed out a few weeks ago, like our flowering phenology, the oaks broke buds a few weeks early this year.

Remember this photo? I took it in early April, more than a month before oaks typically reach this point.

The stage thus is set. I have the records of where I saw the migrants last year, a late year when the oaks were not leafing out until the second half of May. I remarked in my notes that they were doing so around May 19, so I will take that as my dividing point. I can look at last year’s data, and this year’s, and see if the birds lose their apparent preference for the buckthorn woodlands now that they have leafy oaks as an alternative.

As a starting point I compared the bird counts from April 20 to May 18 last year to those from May 19 to May 31, when migration was essentially done. I considered only species that spend their winters south of the continental U.S. and that do not breed on the Mayslake preserve, to keep things as uniform and unbiased as possible. Even with those restrictions, I had 22 species to work with. For the moment ignoring species by species comparisons, here are the 2011 totals. In buckthorn woodlands before May 19, I made 80 observations of birds in the target group. The corresponding total for restored savanna areas in that same time period was 34 (these counts are not normalized for the relative areas of the two habitats, but the buckthorn area I used for this comparison is smaller, at 5.7 acres, than the savanna at 8.5). So the data support the notion that, at least early in the migration season before the oaks leafed out, the lower quality, buckthorn- and honeysuckle-dominated woodland harbored more birds. What about the latter part of the migration season, after May 18? Things had slowed down at that point, and the migrant species composition changed somewhat, but the totals last year were 24 observations in the buckthorn woodland and 28 in the savannas. Clearly the tide turned after the oaks began to leaf out (for the statistics cognoscenti, the chi-squared contingency table produced a test statistic value of 14.36 at 1 degree of freedom, highly significant). I will report on what happens this year, but if my hypothesis is correct, the oak savanna should prove more attractive to these migrants this year in both parts of the season.

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2 Comments

  1. May 11, 2012 at 11:52 pm

    look forward to reading about your findings.

  2. May 22, 2012 at 6:03 am

    [...] woodlands because usually the oaks have not yet leafed out to provide food and shelter. Data from last year supported this idea, because late-season migrants showed a shift from the buckthorns to the newly leafing oaks. This [...]


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